Reading comprehension test 167

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Reading comprehension questions answers for competitive exam

Question 1 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Public libraries, maintained by the local authorities, are well developed and progressive, and everywhere allow people to borrow books without charge. The books in the lending section are always kept on open shelves, and library staffs are very helpful in getting books on request from other libraries through the exchange system. Most libraries report an increase in borrowing over the past few years, so television does not seem to be stopping people from reading, as it was feared that it would. It is explained in the passage that any book which is not available in one library ..... .
A
should be reported to the librarian
B
spoils the whole lending system of the public libraries
C
can be brought from another
D
won't be available at any library
Question 2 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Public libraries, maintained by the local authorities, are well developed and progressive, and everywhere allow people to borrow books without charge. The books in the lending section are always kept on open shelves, and library staffs are very helpful in getting books on request from other libraries through the exchange system. Most libraries report an increase in borrowing over the past few years, so television does not seem to be stopping people from reading, as it was feared that it would. As pointed out in the passage, people nowadays ..... . .
A
are using the exchange system less and less frequently
B
complain a great deal about the poor services the libraries are offering
C
prefer entertaining television programs to reading
D
are using public libraries more than they used to in the past
Question 3 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Public libraries, maintained by the local authorities, are well developed and progressive, and everywhere allow people to borrow books without charge. The books in the lending section are always kept on open shelves, and library staffs are very helpful in getting books on request from other libraries through the exchange system. Most libraries report an increase in borrowing over the past few years, so television does not seem to be stopping people from reading, as it was feared that it would. The passage gives us the impression that public libraries ..... . .
A
do not cooperate with each other at all
B
are understaffed and poorly equipped
C
charge more than is necessary for the services given
D
are working extremely efficiently at present
Question 4 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Fahrenheit is the system of measuring the temperature, how hot or cold something is, used by many people in Britain. The freezing point of Fahrenheit is 32 degrees. So a cold winter's day in Britain would have a temperature of 38 F (3 centigrade), and a hot summer's day would have a temperature of 90 F (32 centigrade). The Fahrenheit scale was invented by the German scientist Gabriel Fahrenheit in 1710. Today in Britain most people over twenty-five know the Fahrenheit scale but the centigrade system (Celsius) is being used more and more. Weather forecasts on television and in newspapers show temperature in both scales. It is explained in the passage that the term ''Fahrenheit ..... .
A
has retained its popularity among young people
B
refers to the scale of temperature between 32 and 90
C
is very rarely used in Britain today
D
derives from the name of a German scientist
Question 5 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Fahrenheit is the system of measuring the temperature, how hot or cold something is, used by many people in Britain. The freezing point of Fahrenheit is 32 degrees. So a cold winter's day in Britain would have a temperature of 38 F (3 centigrade), and a hot summer's day would have a temperature of 90 F (32 centigrade). The Fahrenheit scale was invented by the German scientist Gabriel Fahrenheit in 1710. Today in Britain most people over twenty-five know the Fahrenheit scale but the centigrade system (Celsius) is being used more and more. Weather forecasts on television and in newspapers show temperature in both scales. It is implied in the passage that in the long run, the Celsius system ..... .
A
will replace the Fahrenheit one
B
will improve and become more reliable
C
will soon fall into disuse
D
seems likely to be favored by newspapers but not by television
Question 6 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Fahrenheit is the system of measuring the temperature, how hot or cold something is, used by many people in Britain. The freezing point of Fahrenheit is 32 degrees. So a cold winter's day in Britain would have a temperature of 38 F (3 centigrade), and a hot summer's day would have a temperature of 90 F (32 centigrade). The Fahrenheit scale was invented by the German scientist Gabriel Fahrenheit in 1710. Today in Britain most people over twenty-five know the Fahrenheit scale but the centigrade system (Celsius) is being used more and more. Weather forecasts on television and in newspapers show temperature in both scales. The passage deals with ..... .
A
the declining popularity of the Celsius scale in Britain
B
the advantages of the Fahrenheit scale over the Celsius scale
C
two different systems of measuring the temperature
D
the range in temperature to be found in the British isles
Question 7 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
The Falklands are a group of small islands in the South Atlantic close to Argentina, with a population of 1, 200 British citizens. They have been British territory since 1892. Disputes about who owns the islands go back to the eighteenth century. Argentina has long claimed that these islands, which they call the Malvinas, belong to them. They occupied the islands in April 1982 and the Falklands War lasted until July 1982 when British forces won them back. The Falklands War had an enormous impact on Britain and is still controversial. Some people see it as a restoration of Britain's old imperial power. It is pointed out in the passage that both Britain and Argentina ..... .
A
realize that these islands are of no importance to anyone
B
were reluctant to start the Falklands War
C
regard the Falklands as their own territory
D
prefer to use the name 'Malvinas' for these islands
Question 8 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
The Falklands are a group of small islands in the South Atlantic close to Argentina, with a population of 1, 200 British citizens. They have been British territory since 1892. Disputes about who owns the islands go back to the eighteenth century. Argentina has long claimed that these islands, which they call the Malvinas, belong to them. They occupied the islands in April 1982 and the Falklands War lasted until July 1982 when British forces won them back. The Falklands War had an enormous impact on Britain and is still controversial. Some people see it as a restoration of Britain's old imperial power. According to the passage, the Falklands War ..... .
A
was being fought, on and off, between 1892 and 1982
B
was largely ignored by the British public
C
broke out after the islands were invaded by Argentina
D
showed how right Argentina was in claiming the islands
Question 9 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
The Falklands are a group of small islands in the South Atlantic close to Argentina, with a population of 1, 200 British citizens. They have been British territory since 1892. Disputes about who owns the islands go back to the eighteenth century. Argentina has long claimed that these islands, which they call the Malvinas, belong to them. They occupied the islands in April 1982 and the Falklands War lasted until July 1982 when British forces won them back. The Falklands War had an enormous impact on Britain and is still controversial. Some people see it as a restoration of Britain's old imperial power. One may conclude from the passage that, even today, Britain's hold over the Falkland Islands ..... .
A
is regarded as politically and economically unnecessary by everyone in Britain
B
has not been accepted anywhere but in Argentina
C
causes more problems than benefits to the British public is felt by some people to be a continuation of the British imperial rule
D
could, in all likelihood, lead to another war between Britain and other powers
Question 10 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Many countries in the world are faced with the appalling connected problems of increasing population and a shortage of food. It has been estimated that by the year 2010 the world's population will have risen to about ten thousand million. It therefore seems that more countries could find themselves in this situation in the future. There are a number of possible solutions to the problem, but none of them is easy. Firstly, the governments in such countries could discourage people from having large families. Secondly, the people ought to bring new agricultural machinery, modernise their farming methods and develop more land so as to produce enough food to satisfy the needs of the people. And finally, countries with a food shortage should try to import some of the food they need from other countries by exporting their oil, wood, iron or whatever they have. All of these possible solutions (and there are of course many more) simplify the problem. However, they show that, if people mean to solve the problems of increasing population and food shortages, there are means of doing so. 1. The with passage is mainly concerned with..... .
A
the easy solutions to meet the needs of the people living in most of the countries in the world
B
the connection between the problems of increasing population and shortage of food
C
the problems of many countries in the world related to the multiplying population and shortage of food as well as several solutions
D
the adverse effects of the decreasing number of people in the world because of the shortage of food
Question 11 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Many countries in the world are faced with the appalling connected problems of increasing population and a shortage of food. It has been estimated that by the year 2010 the world's population will have risen to about ten thousand million. It therefore seems that more countries could find themselves in this situation in the future. There are a number of possible solutions to the problem, but none of them is easy. Firstly, the governments in such countries could discourage people from having large families. Secondly, the people ought to bring new agricultural machinery, modernise their farming methods and develop more land so as to produce enough food to satisfy the needs of the people. And finally, countries with a food shortage should try to import some of the food they need from other countries by exporting their oil, wood, iron or whatever they have. All of these possible solutions (and there are of course many more) simplify the problem. However, they show that, if people mean to solve the problems of increasing population and food shortages, there are means of doing so. 2. We may infer from the passage that..... .
A
having six or seven children is more common than being the parents of one or two in our world today
B
the governments of the populous countries should have the biggest responsibility to cope with the problem of lack of food supply for their people
C
one of the problems in countries which cannot produce enough food for their own people is that farming methods are very simple and often inefficient
D
the possible solutions to the problems of increasing population and shortage of food in the world should not be restricted to the ones mentioned in the passage
Question 12 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Many countries in the world are faced with the appalling connected problems of increasing population and a shortage of food. It has been estimated that by the year 2010 the world's population will have risen to about ten thousand million. It therefore seems that more countries could find themselves in this situation in the future. There are a number of possible solutions to the problem, but none of them is easy. Firstly, the governments in such countries could discourage people from having large families. Secondly, the people ought to bring new agricultural machinery, modernise their farming methods and develop more land so as to produce enough food to satisfy the needs of the people. And finally, countries with a food shortage should try to import some of the food they need from other countries by exporting their oil, wood, iron or whatever they have. All of these possible solutions (and there are of course many more) simplify the problem. However, they show that, if people mean to solve the problems of increasing population and food shortages, there are means of doing so. 3. As included in the passage, mentioning the problems of increasing world population and a shortage of food as well as several solutions, the writer tries to warn us..... . .
A
against the governments who do not want to take measures in order to solve the problem of poverty in underdeveloped countries
B
although he doesn't care about any of the problems he mentioned beforehand
C
against thinking that it will be easy to solve the problems of increasing world population and a shortage of food in the world
D
since he himself lives in a poor and populated country
Question 13 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Oscar Niemeyer was a Brazilian architect and the greatest South American exponent of modern architecture. He was fortunate to work in a country relatively unhampered by traditional forms and wealthy enough to finance large projects. Shortly after graduating, he joined the team of designers of the new Ministry of Education and Health building in Rio de Janerio. Le Corbusier went over to Brazil for a time in 1936 to work on the same project, and Niemeyer was very much influenced by the established master. Over the next few years his own idiom developed rapidly: the debt to Corbusier remained, but was modified increasingly by Niemeyer's own fertile and lyrical imagination. Curved forms, curves cut by verticals or horizontals, and the expressive power of low, long and uniform facades became the hallmarks of his style. He has been associated with four great schemes in Brazil. The first of them was a group of buildings near the airport in Belo Horizonte in the early 1940's, and there he displayed that wide variety of structures that was already to be his speciality. His greatest opportunity came with the decision to found a new capital at Brazilia, and between 1950 and 1960 Niemeyer was engaged on the design of the public buildings. One of these included the President's Palace with its elegant curving concrete forms supporting the overhang of the roof and the daring design for the cathedral. 4. According to the passage, Niemeyer was lucky in where he worked because..... . .
A
Brazil had a long architectural tradition
B
Brazil had little traditional architecture
C
he was able to receive the best training
D
he worked in Rio de Janeiro
Question 14 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Oscar Niemeyer was a Brazilian architect and the greatest South American exponent of modern architecture. He was fortunate to work in a country relatively unhampered by traditional forms and wealthy enough to finance large projects. Shortly after graduating, he joined the team of designers of the new Ministry of Education and Health building in Rio de Janerio. Le Corbusier went over to Brazil for a time in 1936 to work on the same project, and Niemeyer was very much influenced by the established master. Over the next few years his own idiom developed rapidly: the debt to Corbusier remained, but was modified increasingly by Niemeyer's own fertile and lyrical imagination. Curved forms, curves cut by verticals or horizontals, and the expressive power of low, long and uniform facades became the hallmarks of his style. He has been associated with four great schemes in Brazil. The first of them was a group of buildings near the airport in Belo Horizonte in the early 1940's, and there he displayed that wide variety of structures that was already to be his speciality. His greatest opportunity came with the decision to found a new capital at Brazilia, and between 1950 and 1960 Niemeyer was engaged on the design of the public buildings. One of these included the President's Palace with its elegant curving concrete forms supporting the overhang of the roof and the daring design for the cathedral. 5. As is mentioned in the passage, Le Corbusier was..... . .
A
the architect who designed Brasilia
B
the architect who initially influenced Niemeyer
C
affected by Niemeyer very much
D
the founder of South American modem architecture
Question 15 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Oscar Niemeyer was a Brazilian architect and the greatest South American exponent of modern architecture. He was fortunate to work in a country relatively unhampered by traditional forms and wealthy enough to finance large projects. Shortly after graduating, he joined the team of designers of the new Ministry of Education and Health building in Rio de Janerio. Le Corbusier went over to Brazil for a time in 1936 to work on the same project, and Niemeyer was very much influenced by the established master. Over the next few years his own idiom developed rapidly: the debt to Corbusier remained, but was modified increasingly by Niemeyer's own fertile and lyrical imagination. Curved forms, curves cut by verticals or horizontals, and the expressive power of low, long and uniform facades became the hallmarks of his style. He has been associated with four great schemes in Brazil. The first of them was a group of buildings near the airport in Belo Horizonte in the early 1940's, and there he displayed that wide variety of structures that was already to be his speciality. His greatest opportunity came with the decision to found a new capital at Brazilia, and between 1950 and 1960 Niemeyer was engaged on the design of the public buildings. One of these included the President's Palace with its elegant curving concrete forms supporting the overhang of the roof and the daring design for the cathedral. 6. As concluded in the passage, Niemeyer..... . .
A
was quite conventional in terms of style
B
has greatly influenced world architecture
C
was not appreciated in his native country
D
worked for the Brazilian government extensively
Question 16 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
FUBU started in 1992 when Daymond John decided to try and make some money by designing and selling the kind of hats he wanted to wear himself but could never find. Daymond turned half of his home in Queens, New York into a factory and other half into a living space for the 'Team!' The ''Team consisted of a group of neighbourhood friends, all of whom are an integral part of the company. By 1995 FUBU were making shirts, rugby shirts, sweat shirts, denim, underwear, outerwear, boots and shoes with raw materials from around the world. Today FUBU make women's and children's clothes s well. The collection is also sold internationally in France, Japan, Germany and Australia. Top musical artists such as Mariah Carey and Snoop Doggy Dog have given FUBU their stamp of approval. 7. The passage is mainly concerned with..... .
A
how a way of life developed into an international business
B
the advantages of working at home
C
the importance of raw material in the textile industry
D
FUBU which make clothes are now very famous between celebrities
Question 17 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
FUBU started in 1992 when Daymond John decided to try and make some money by designing and selling the kind of hats he wanted to wear himself but could never find. Daymond turned half of his home in Queens, New York into a factory and other half into a living space for the 'Team!' The ''Team consisted of a group of neighbourhood friends, all of whom are an integral part of the company. By 1995 FUBU were making shirts, rugby shirts, sweat shirts, denim, underwear, outerwear, boots and shoes with raw materials from around the world. Today FUBU make women's and children's clothes s well. The collection is also sold internationally in France, Japan, Germany and Australia. Top musical artists such as Mariah Carey and Snoop Doggy Dog have given FUBU their stamp of approval. 8. It's understood from the passage that..... .
A
some top musical artists joined the team of FUBU after 1995
B
when FUBU first started the clothing business, it was not selling children's and women's clothes
C
the FUBU collection could never achieve to enter the world market
D
FUBU was a family firm initiated in 1990s
Question 18 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
FUBU started in 1992 when Daymond John decided to try and make some money by designing and selling the kind of hats he wanted to wear himself but could never find. Daymond turned half of his home in Queens, New York into a factory and other half into a living space for the 'Team!' The ''Team consisted of a group of neighbourhood friends, all of whom are an integral part of the company. By 1995 FUBU were making shirts, rugby shirts, sweat shirts, denim, underwear, outerwear, boots and shoes with raw materials from around the world. Today FUBU make women's and children's clothes s well. The collection is also sold internationally in France, Japan, Germany and Australia. Top musical artists such as Mariah Carey and Snoop Doggy Dog have given FUBU their stamp of approval. 9. One may conclude from the passage that..... . .
A
FUBU staff is made up of personalities from all parts of the globe
B
FUBU has gained a popularity which has even drawn the attention of famous singers
C
FUBU entered the world market in 1995
D
The FUBU company started in a workplace in Queens and developed into an international business
Question 19 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Hilaria Supa wears the ancestral clothing and round hat typical of peasant women from her village near Cusco, the former Inca capital in Peru. She also speaks Quechua, the language of the Inca Empire, which is still used widely in Peruvian Andes. She claims that she has no real need for Spanish because her neighbours all speak Quechua. But that doesn't go for other members of Peru's Congress, to which Ms Supa has just been elected. Along with a colleague, Ms Supa, who speaks fluent Spanish, has insisted on speaking to the legislature in her first language. This, she says, will increase respect for Andean Indian culture and help the language to survive. It has forced the Congress to hire translators. Although Quechua . has long been in slow-decline, chiefly because the children of migrants to the cities rarely speak it, it is now getting a lot more attention, as a result of Ms Supa's struggles. 10.It is implied in the passage that Hilaria Supa..... . .
A
is a volunteer supporter of a traditional language called Quechua which is now on the brink of extinction
B
is thought to be a racist because of her insistence on speaking to the members of the Congress in Quechua
C
knows only a little Spanish
D
is about to lose her position in the congress since she speaks Quechua
Question 20 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Hilaria Supa wears the ancestral clothing and round hat typical of peasant women from her village near Cusco, the former Inca capital in Peru. She also speaks Quechua, the language of the Inca Empire, which is still used widely in Peruvian Andes. She claims that she has no real need for Spanish because her neighbours all speak Quechua. But that doesn't go for other members of Peru's Congress, to which Ms Supa has just been elected. Along with a colleague, Ms Supa, who speaks fluent Spanish, has insisted on speaking to the legislature in her first language. This, she says, will increase respect for Andean Indian culture and help the language to survive. It has forced the Congress to hire translators. Although Quechua . has long been in slow-decline, chiefly because the children of migrants to the cities rarely speak it, it is now getting a lot more attention, as a result of Ms Supa's struggles. 11. We can understand from the passage that in some parts of Peru..... . .
A
there is no need to recognize and overcome its ethnic inequalities
B
there are people who have asserted that the results of the recent election don't show the reality
C
it is enough to know just Quechua to communicate with the people around rather than Spanish
D
Ms Supa has a lot of fans that are ready to act as she wants them to do
Question 21 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Hilaria Supa wears the ancestral clothing and round hat typical of peasant women from her village near Cusco, the former Inca capital in Peru. She also speaks Quechua, the language of the Inca Empire, which is still used widely in Peruvian Andes. She claims that she has no real need for Spanish because her neighbours all speak Quechua. But that doesn't go for other members of Peru's Congress, to which Ms Supa has just been elected. Along with a colleague, Ms Supa, who speaks fluent Spanish, has insisted on speaking to the legislature in her first language. This, she says, will increase respect for Andean Indian culture and help the language to survive. It has forced the Congress to hire translators. Although Quechua . has long been in slow-decline, chiefly because the children of migrants to the cities rarely speak it, it is now getting a lot more attention, as a result of Ms Supa's struggles. 12. It is clear in the passage that the main reason why Quechua, the language of the Inca Empire, has long been in slow decline is that..... . .
A
Quechua isn't taught in the schools in Peru
B
the usage of Quechua is now limited to the highland areas where it is predominant by law
C
the new generation among local people growing up in the cities hardly ever speak Quechua
D
the cost of hiring a translator is very high in Cusco
Question 22 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Do you sudoku? Even if you don't have any chance to do, you absolutely know somebody who does. Once little-known outside Japan, this addictive brainteaser has become a staple of newspaper puzzle pages the world over. Sudoku's dazzling success owes much to its simplicity requiring neither mathematical ability nor general knowledge and with just a sentence or two of instructions-the puzzle is absurdly easy to learn yet hard to master. ''All you need is the ability to recognise the difference between nine different symbols that don't even have to be numeric.'' explains Michael Mepham, a veteran puzzler and sudoku compiler. Some clever marketing has helped. Western newspapers were quick to identify sudoku as a circulation, booster and worked hard at promoting the puzzle. ''Without this, '' says Mr Mepham, ''it would not have taken off.'' 13. We may infer from the passage that thanks to Sudoku, ..... .
A
the aid of the witty marketing was seen
B
people began to work harder to improve the puzzles available on the market
C
puzzles became available online
D
the circulation amounts of Western newspapers increased
Question 23 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Do you sudoku? Even if you don't have any chance to do, you absolutely know somebody who does. Once little-known outside Japan, this addictive brainteaser has become a staple of newspaper puzzle pages the world over. Sudoku's dazzling success owes much to its simplicity requiring neither mathematical ability nor general knowledge and with just a sentence or two of instructions-the puzzle is absurdly easy to learn yet hard to master. ''All you need is the ability to recognise the difference between nine different symbols that don't even have to be numeric.'' explains Michael Mepham, a veteran puzzler and sudoku compiler. Some clever marketing has helped. Western newspapers were quick to identify sudoku as a circulation, booster and worked hard at promoting the puzzle. ''Without this, '' says Mr Mepham, ''it would not have taken off.'' 14. As is stated in the passage, Sudoku's achievement mostly results from..... .
A
the desire of people who want to improve their skills while coping with it
B
a great mathematical ability and general knowledge
C
the proportion of its profits compared to its counterparts
D
its lack of complexity
Question 24 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Do you sudoku? Even if you don't have any chance to do, you absolutely know somebody who does. Once little-known outside Japan, this addictive brainteaser has become a staple of newspaper puzzle pages the world over. Sudoku's dazzling success owes much to its simplicity requiring neither mathematical ability nor general knowledge and with just a sentence or two of instructions-the puzzle is absurdly easy to learn yet hard to master. ''All you need is the ability to recognise the difference between nine different symbols that don't even have to be numeric.'' explains Michael Mepham, a veteran puzzler and sudoku compiler. Some clever marketing has helped. Western newspapers were quick to identify sudoku as a circulation, booster and worked hard at promoting the puzzle. ''Without this, '' says Mr Mepham, ''it would not have taken off.'' 15. As concluded in the passage, Sudoku took off because..... . .
A
Western newspapers worked hard at promoting the puzzle since they saw it as a circulation booster
B
most of the people know and like Sudoku
C
people finally found a suitable field to improve their skills
D
Some clever marketing blocked the sales of other puzzles
Question 25 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Photography often blurs the distinction between art and reality. Modern technology has made that blurring easier. In the digital darkroom photographers can manipulate images and threaten the integrity of endeavours that rely on them. Several journalists have been fired for such activity in recent months, including one from Reuters for faking pictures in Lebanon. Earlier this year, the investigation into Hwang Woosuk showed the South Korean scientist had changed images purporting to show cloning. In an effort to real in photography, camera makers are making it more obvious when images have been altered by using several coding systems. 16. The passage mainly explains that..... .
A
the real photographs taken by the photographers can be distinguished from the fake ones with the help of technology
B
it isn't ethically wrong to fake pictures so as to make people believe something unreal in the press
C
it is difficult to notice a fault on a photo in the modern world because of the lack of necessary technological techniques
D
alteration or manipulation on a photograph will certainly cause a journalist to be dismissed from his position
Question 26 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Photography often blurs the distinction between art and reality. Modern technology has made that blurring easier. In the digital darkroom photographers can manipulate images and threaten the integrity of endeavours that rely on them. Several journalists have been fired for such activity in recent months, including one from Reuters for faking pictures in Lebanon. Earlier this year, the investigation into Hwang Woosuk showed the South Korean scientist had changed images purporting to show cloning. In an effort to real in photography, camera makers are making it more obvious when images have been altered by using several coding systems. 17. One point made in the passage that..... .
A
sometimes the best scrutiny is a simple gaze at the photos to see the manipulations on them
B
photoshop was the program used by the journalists fired by Reuters
C
even scientists have recoursed to faking photos in order to deceive the scientific world
D
digital images have natural statistical patterns in the intensity and texture of their pixels
Question 27 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Photography often blurs the distinction between art and reality. Modern technology has made that blurring easier. In the digital darkroom photographers can manipulate images and threaten the integrity of endeavours that rely on them. Several journalists have been fired for such activity in recent months, including one from Reuters for faking pictures in Lebanon. Earlier this year, the investigation into Hwang Woosuk showed the South Korean scientist had changed images purporting to show cloning. In an effort to real in photography, camera makers are making it more obvious when images have been altered by using several coding systems. 18. It can be inferred from the passage that..... . .
A
digital forgery or digital alterations on a photo can be done in any environment
B
there are more than one way to make it clear that a photo is not real but a fake one today
C
up to now only one journalist has lost his job because of faking photos
D
internet has been proven as an effective check on digital forgery
There are 27 questions to complete.

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