Reading comprehension test 168

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Reading comprehension questions answers for competitive exam

Question 1 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Oscar Wilde was born in Dublin in 1854, to parents who were both prominent citizens. In her youth, Wilde's mother had achieved a transatlantic reputation as the author of inspiring nationalistic poetry, published under the name of ''Speranza''. Wilde's father, William, knighted by the British queen in 1864, was a medical specialist in complaints of the eye, who, although a staunch Protestant, showed his nationalism in collecting and preparing for print tales of Irish folklore. Oscar Wilde attended public school at Portora Royal School and gained undergraduate degrees in classic at Dublin's Trinity College and Oxford's Magdalen College. As a student, he showed promise not simply as a linguist, but as a witty exponent of the ideas and philosophy of life which he found in the writings of the ancients. One day, at the university, when challenged about his ambitions in life, Wilde replied prophetically: ''I'll be a poet, a writer, a dramatist, somehow or other. I'll be famous, and if not famous, I'll be notorious.'' When I read about Oscar Wilde's life in detail, you will notice that he achieved all his ambitions about which he had dreamed in his university years successfully. 19. It is stated in the passage that Oscar Wilde was the son of parents..... . .
A
who were the initial and the most fervent exponents of the nationalistic literature in Ireland
B
who displayed their love towards their nation through their literal works
C
that were successful opticians and at the same time religious people
D
from whom Oscar Wilde definitely took his inspirations and ability in writing
Question 2 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Oscar Wilde was born in Dublin in 1854, to parents who were both prominent citizens. In her youth, Wilde's mother had achieved a transatlantic reputation as the author of inspiring nationalistic poetry, published under the name of ''Speranza''. Wilde's father, William, knighted by the British queen in 1864, was a medical specialist in complaints of the eye, who, although a staunch Protestant, showed his nationalism in collecting and preparing for print tales of Irish folklore. Oscar Wilde attended public school at Portora Royal School and gained undergraduate degrees in classic at Dublin's Trinity College and Oxford's Magdalen College. As a student, he showed promise not simply as a linguist, but as a witty exponent of the ideas and philosophy of life which he found in the writings of the ancients. One day, at the university, when challenged about his ambitions in life, Wilde replied prophetically: ''I'll be a poet, a writer, a dramatist, somehow or other. I'll be famous, and if not famous, I'll be notorious.'' When I read about Oscar Wilde's life in detail, you will notice that he achieved all his ambitions about which he had dreamed in his university years successfully. 20. From information given in the passage, we can infer that Oscar Wilde..... . .
A
always gave prophetic answers to the people who asked him questions about his character
B
seemed to be determined to be recognized and known by people throughout the world one day when he was at the university
C
had a family which was not very important for the British Royal Family
D
was not a hardworking and successful student when he was in the public school
Question 3 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Oscar Wilde was born in Dublin in 1854, to parents who were both prominent citizens. In her youth, Wilde's mother had achieved a transatlantic reputation as the author of inspiring nationalistic poetry, published under the name of ''Speranza''. Wilde's father, William, knighted by the British queen in 1864, was a medical specialist in complaints of the eye, who, although a staunch Protestant, showed his nationalism in collecting and preparing for print tales of Irish folklore. Oscar Wilde attended public school at Portora Royal School and gained undergraduate degrees in classic at Dublin's Trinity College and Oxford's Magdalen College. As a student, he showed promise not simply as a linguist, but as a witty exponent of the ideas and philosophy of life which he found in the writings of the ancients. One day, at the university, when challenged about his ambitions in life, Wilde replied prophetically: ''I'll be a poet, a writer, a dramatist, somehow or other. I'll be famous, and if not famous, I'll be notorious.'' When I read about Oscar Wilde's life in detail, you will notice that he achieved all his ambitions about which he had dreamed in his university years successfully. 21. One may conclude from the passage that Oscar Wilde..... . .
A
could become famous only for his critics he wrote during his academic career
B
wrote different works in almost all the genres of literature
C
was never interested in philosophy and ancient writings
D
wasn't able to make his dreams about life come true
Question 4 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Although most things in Darie'n are cheap, travel is not. One needs substantial amounts of time or money, preferably both. For two reasons: it is not easy to get around, and it is not safe. It is not easy because, south of Yaviza, there are no roads. It is unsafe because of the Colombian civil war. Neither the Panamanian nor do the Colombian governments have control over the border, so guerrillas, paramilitaries and bandits freely cross back and forth. Despite their lack of control over the border area, Panama's police force is reasonably professional and not particularly corrupt. Unfortunately, for most visitors this only makes travel more difficult, as the police periodically close regions of Darie'n to foreigners. Knowing they have no control over certain regions, they'd rather foreign travellers did not go at all to avoid the chance of kidnappings. 22. It may be understood from the passage that..... . .
A
governments of both Panama and Colombia have strict control over the border, so people can wander around freely
B
it's really difficult to travel in Dafie'n since there are few roads
C
Darie'n is one of the cheapest places in the world in terms of accommodation and travel
D
Darie'n can be insecure for foreigners because of the political fe| unrest in the region
Question 5 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Although most things in Darie'n are cheap, travel is not. One needs substantial amounts of time or money, preferably both. For two reasons: it is not easy to get around, and it is not safe. It is not easy because, south of Yaviza, there are no roads. It is unsafe because of the Colombian civil war. Neither the Panamanian nor do the Colombian governments have control over the border, so guerrillas, paramilitaries and bandits freely cross back and forth. Despite their lack of control over the border area, Panama's police force is reasonably professional and not particularly corrupt. Unfortunately, for most visitors this only makes travel more difficult, as the police periodically close regions of Darie'n to foreigners. Knowing they have no control over certain regions, they'd rather foreign travellers did not go at all to avoid the chance of kidnappings. 23. According to the passage..... . .
A
Panama Police Force's being Professional does not make travelling easier for most of the foreigners
B
Colombian civil war led to a governmental charge in Panama
C
Yaviza is a safer place to visit than Darie'n
D
guerillas, paramilitaries and bandits have taken over the administrative power in the country
Question 6 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Although most things in Darie'n are cheap, travel is not. One needs substantial amounts of time or money, preferably both. For two reasons: it is not easy to get around, and it is not safe. It is not easy because, south of Yaviza, there are no roads. It is unsafe because of the Colombian civil war. Neither the Panamanian nor do the Colombian governments have control over the border, so guerrillas, paramilitaries and bandits freely cross back and forth. Despite their lack of control over the border area, Panama's police force is reasonably professional and not particularly corrupt. Unfortunately, for most visitors this only makes travel more difficult, as the police periodically close regions of Darie'n to foreigners. Knowing they have no control over certain regions, they'd rather foreign travellers did not go at all to avoid the chance of kidnappings. 24. As it is suggested in the passage, visitors wanting to travel in Darie'n need time and money because..... . .
A
they will be in need of hiring bodyguards who will be in charge of shielding them against kidnappers
B
it is troublesome and risky to wander around on account of the lack of roads and the civil war in Colombia
C
everything is very expensive and there lies a huge country under their feet
D
the bureaucracy is top slow and they always have to bribe to the policemen at the border
Question 7 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
The technology of the North American Colonies did not differ strikingly from that of Europe, but in one respect, the colonists enjoyed a great advantage. Especially by comparison with Britain, Americans had a wonderfully plentiful supply of wood. The first colonists didn't, as many people imagine, find an entire continent covered by a climax forest. Even along the Atlantic seaboard, the forest was broken at many points, a Nevertheless, all sorts of fine trees abounded, and through the early colonial period, those who pushed westward encountered new forests. By the end of the colonial era, the price of wood had risen, slightly in eastern cities, but wood was still extremely abundant and it was a foundation of the economy. Houses and all manner of buildings were made of wood to a degree unknown in Britain. Secondly, wood was used as a fuel for heating and cooking.Thirdly, it was used as the source of important industrial compounds, such as potash, an industrial alkali; charcoal, a component of gunpowder; and tannic acid.The passage mainly discusses..... . .
A
the difference between charcoal and tannic value
B
the roots of the Industrial Revolution
C
the negative effects of an abundance of wood on the colonies
D
the advantages of using wood in the colonies
Question 8 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
The technology of the North American Colonies did not differ strikingly from that of Europe, but in one respect, the colonists enjoyed a great advantage. Especially by comparison with Britain, Americans had a wonderfully plentiful supply of wood. The first colonists didn't, as many people imagine, find an entire continent covered by a climax forest. Even along the Atlantic seaboard, the forest was broken at many points, a Nevertheless, all sorts of fine trees abounded, and through the early colonial period, those who pushed westward encountered new forests. By the end of the colonial era, the price of wood had risen, slightly in eastern cities, but wood was still extremely abundant and it was a foundation of the economy. Houses and all manner of buildings were made of wood to a degree unknown in Britain. Secondly, wood was used as a fuel for heating and cooking.Thirdly, it was used as the source of important industrial compounds, such as potash, an industrial alkali; charcoal, a component of gunpowder; and tannic acid. 2. As is stated in the passage, by the end of the Colonial period, the price of wood in eastern cities..... . .
A
decreased rapidly owing to lower demand
B
was slightly higher than in previous years
C
was very much higher than it was in Britain
D
was protested by the public
Question 9 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
The technology of the North American Colonies did not differ strikingly from that of Europe, but in one respect, the colonists enjoyed a great advantage. Especially by comparison with Britain, Americans had a wonderfully plentiful supply of wood. The first colonists didn't, as many people imagine, find an entire continent covered by a climax forest. Even along the Atlantic seaboard, the forest was broken at many points, a Nevertheless, all sorts of fine trees abounded, and through the early colonial period, those who pushed westward encountered new forests. By the end of the colonial era, the price of wood had risen, slightly in eastern cities, but wood was still extremely abundant and it was a foundation of the economy. Houses and all manner of buildings were made of wood to a degree unknown in Britain. Secondly, wood was used as a fuel for heating and cooking.Thirdly, it was used as the source of important industrial compounds, such as potash, an industrial alkali; charcoal, a component of gunpowder; and tannic acid. 3. It's implied in the passage that, houses in Britain during the period mentioned in the passage were..... . .
A
all made of wood
B
generally built with imported materials
C
usually built from materials other than wood
D
more expensive than American houses
Question 10 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
When they first appeared a few years ago, smart phones were marketed as the Swiss. Army knife of personal communications, combining the versatility of a hand-held computer with the connectivity of a mobile phone. What set them apart from standard mobile phones was their ability to download and run a broad range of third-party software applications. In theory, this meant users did not have to settle for the software applications that came with the device. In practice, however, the novelty value of having a currency converter, weather services, various different city maps and pocket sudoku crammed onto your phone soon wore off. Similarly, the logistics of viewing Excel spreadsheets or editing Word documents on such device was only for die-hard enthusiasts. In short, until now smart phones have amounted to not much more than executive toys, doing little to improve anyone's productivity. 4. It is stated in the passage that one of the features that makes smart phones different from the standard mobile phones was that..... . .
A
smart phones were produced as a sharp gun to be used in the Swiss Army
B
smart phones were capable of operating a wider range of software practices than a standard mobile phone
C
smart phones were being retailed as a typical and ordinary device for personal communications in a different way
D
standard mobile phones brought together many applications of a hand-held computer with the connectivity of a handy
Question 11 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
When they first appeared a few years ago, smart phones were marketed as the Swiss. Army knife of personal communications, combining the versatility of a hand-held computer with the connectivity of a mobile phone. What set them apart from standard mobile phones was their ability to download and run a broad range of third-party software applications. In theory, this meant users did not have to settle for the software applications that came with the device. In practice, however, the novelty value of having a currency converter, weather services, various different city maps and pocket sudoku crammed onto your phone soon wore off. Similarly, the logistics of viewing Excel spreadsheets or editing Word documents on such device was only for die-hard enthusiasts. In short, until now smart phones have amounted to not much more than executive toys, doing little to improve anyone's productivity. 5. One may infer from the passage that smart phones seemed to ..... .
A
prove useless in practice contrary to expectations in theory
B
be an invention designed by a Swiss mechanician to make the Swiss public astonished
C
be a device in which nobody showed any interest because of its market price
D
be produced for the people who likes solving puzzles in the digital environment
Question 12 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
When they first appeared a few years ago, smart phones were marketed as the Swiss. Army knife of personal communications, combining the versatility of a hand-held computer with the connectivity of a mobile phone. What set them apart from standard mobile phones was their ability to download and run a broad range of third-party software applications. In theory, this meant users did not have to settle for the software applications that came with the device. In practice, however, the novelty value of having a currency converter, weather services, various different city maps and pocket sudoku crammed onto your phone soon wore off. Similarly, the logistics of viewing Excel spreadsheets or editing Word documents on such device was only for die-hard enthusiasts. In short, until now smart phones have amounted to not much more than executive toys, doing little to improve anyone's productivity. 6. It can be inferred from the passage that certain features of smart phones..... .
A
didn't appeal to everybody
B
were not explained theoretically enough to understand how to function
C
were in no need of updating in a short time
D
helped the users enchance their productivity
Question 13 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Combine current ideas about childhood development and interactive learning with a dwindling number of safe street corners and what you get? A global boom in children's museums. Museums designed to encourage parents to learn from each other, and children to teach themselves, are booming around the world. From Boston to Los Angeles and Shanghai to Dubai, museums for children are breaking ground, expanding, and hiring world-class architects to design eco-friendly landmarks. The kudos from professional educators promises welcome enrichment to cash-strapped public schools and to hopeful parents of Harvard-bound toddlers 7. The passage is mainly concerned with..... .
A
where the children's museums are being built
B
the professional educators' thoughts and attitudes towards the children's museums
C
how safe the museums in the world are for both children and their parents
D
the rapid increase in the number of the children's museums worldwide
Question 14 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Combine current ideas about childhood development and interactive learning with a dwindling number of safe street corners and what you get? A global boom in children's museums. Museums designed to encourage parents to learn from each other, and children to teach themselves, are booming around the world. From Boston to Los Angeles and Shanghai to Dubai, museums for children are breaking ground, expanding, and hiring world-class architects to design eco-friendly landmarks. The kudos from professional educators promises welcome enrichment to cash-strapped public schools and to hopeful parents of Harvard-bound toddlers 8. It is implied in the passage that the children's museums..... . .
A
didn't satisfy the demanding parents at all
B
have only been constructed in downtowns
C
are becoming old-fashioned despite the fact that their numbers are increasing throughout the world
D
are being designed in the way that they will give no damage to the nature by the masterly architects
Question 15 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Combine current ideas about childhood development and interactive learning with a dwindling number of safe street corners and what you get? A global boom in children's museums. Museums designed to encourage parents to learn from each other, and children to teach themselves, are booming around the world. From Boston to Los Angeles and Shanghai to Dubai, museums for children are breaking ground, expanding, and hiring world-class architects to design eco-friendly landmarks. The kudos from professional educators promises welcome enrichment to cash-strapped public schools and to hopeful parents of Harvard-bound toddlers 9. It may be inferred from the passage that the children's museums..... .
A
limit the communication between the parents and their children
B
function as a place to have fun rather than learn for the children
C
were being built in the corners of insecure streets
D
are being planned on the basis of the modern approaches about childhood development and interactive learning
Question 16 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Australia, cut off long ago from other continents, is one of the last places on Earth where one would expect to catch rabies or a related disease transmitted by animals. Yet this prospect is not as far-fetched as it may sound. In the last four years, new diseases carried by animals but affecting human beings have appeared for the first time in Australia and in all these cases bats were involved. Fruit bats are the main cause for concern. They congregate together in large colonies and are found in some of the most heavily populated areas of the continent, Bats are capable of flying up to 200 m kilometres in a single journey and often share a convival roost with other species of bats on their way so it is only too easy for them to spread a disease. The danger is accentuated because people are convinced of their harmlessness and many find them cuddly and in need of protection. 10. According to the passage, in Australia, ..... .
A
the most deadly virus has been identified in the last four years
B
one can have the most secure and comfortable vacation
C
bats are the only threat to human health
D
there's the possibility of catching a disease transmitted by animals
Question 17 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Australia, cut off long ago from other continents, is one of the last places on Earth where one would expect to catch rabies or a related disease transmitted by animals. Yet this prospect is not as far-fetched as it may sound. In the last four years, new diseases carried by animals but affecting human beings have appeared for the first time in Australia and in all these cases bats were involved. Fruit bats are the main cause for concern. They congregate together in large colonies and are found in some of the most heavily populated areas of the continent, Bats are capable of flying up to 200 m kilometres in a single journey and often share a convival roost with other species of bats on their way so it is only too easy for them to spread a disease. The danger is accentuated because people are convinced of their harmlessness and many find them cuddly and in need of protection. 11. It may be inferred from the passage that..... . .
A
fruit bats can only be a minor reason for spreading diseae
B
people are scared of bats since they regard them as evil animals
C
the possible danger coming from bats is always taken seriously by people
D
bats spread disease easily because they seem to mate with each other on their way
Question 18 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Australia, cut off long ago from other continents, is one of the last places on Earth where one would expect to catch rabies or a related disease transmitted by animals. Yet this prospect is not as far-fetched as it may sound. In the last four years, new diseases carried by animals but affecting human beings have appeared for the first time in Australia and in all these cases bats were involved. Fruit bats are the main cause for concern. They congregate together in large colonies and are found in some of the most heavily populated areas of the continent, Bats are capable of flying up to 200 m kilometres in a single journey and often share a convival roost with other species of bats on their way so it is only too easy for them to spread a disease. The danger is accentuated because people are convinced of their harmlessness and many find them cuddly and in need of protection. 12. It's concluded in the passage that one of the reasons why it's ''only too easy'' for bats, to spread disease to human beings is that..... . .
A
people are not afraid of them because they suppose that they're benign
B
bats cannot travel long distances
C
human-beings carry some hazardous disease as well
D
bats aren't able to find areas to setle where many people live
Question 19 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Although the weathermen's forecasts for a month ahead are only a little better than guesswork, they are now making long-term forecasts into the next century with growing confidence. For the dominant trend in the world's climate in the coming decades will, scientists say, be a predictable result of man's activities. At the start of the industrial revolution nearly two centuries ago, man innocently set off a gigantic experiment in planetary engineering. Unaware of what he was doing, he spared no thought for the consequences. Today the possible outcome is alarmingly clear, but the experiment is unstoppable. Within the lifetimes of many us, the Earth may become warmer than it has been for a thousand years. Superficially, a warmer climate may seem welcome. But it could bring many hazards-disruptions of crops in the world's main food-producing regions, famine, economic instability, civil unrest and even war. 13. We learn from the passage that longterm weather forecasts beyond a century from now may seem strange because..... . .
A
none of us will be alive then
B
we cannot know what the consequences of our present activities will be in the future
C
weathermen cannot even forecast next month's weather accurately
D
it is difficult to foresee how much melting of the great ice-caps of Greenland and Antartica will raise sea-levels throughout the world
Question 20 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Although the weathermen's forecasts for a month ahead are only a little better than guesswork, they are now making long-term forecasts into the next century with growing confidence. For the dominant trend in the world's climate in the coming decades will, scientists say, be a predictable result of man's activities. At the start of the industrial revolution nearly two centuries ago, man innocently set off a gigantic experiment in planetary engineering. Unaware of what he was doing, he spared no thought for the consequences. Today the possible outcome is alarmingly clear, but the experiment is unstoppable. Within the lifetimes of many us, the Earth may become warmer than it has been for a thousand years. Superficially, a warmer climate may seem welcome. But it could bring many hazards-disruptions of crops in the world's main food-producing regions, famine, economic instability, civil unrest and even war. 14. As it is stated in the passage, weathermen believe that our future climate will be the direct result of..... .
A
scientific experiments
B
clever long-term forecasts
C
the industrial revolution
D
unconscious farming
Question 21 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Although the weathermen's forecasts for a month ahead are only a little better than guesswork, they are now making long-term forecasts into the next century with growing confidence. For the dominant trend in the world's climate in the coming decades will, scientists say, be a predictable result of man's activities. At the start of the industrial revolution nearly two centuries ago, man innocently set off a gigantic experiment in planetary engineering. Unaware of what he was doing, he spared no thought for the consequences. Today the possible outcome is alarmingly clear, but the experiment is unstoppable. Within the lifetimes of many us, the Earth may become warmer than it has been for a thousand years. Superficially, a warmer climate may seem welcome. But it could bring many hazards-disruptions of crops in the world's main food-producing regions, famine, economic instability, civil unrest and even war. 15. One may infer from the passage that a warmer climate..... . .
A
means that weathermen will be more confident in the coming decades than they are now
B
may cause even war in the long term
C
is like a concept that most of us have no idea about
D
is the unevitable outcome of carbon dioxide emissions and greenhouse effect
Question 22 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
It is an interesting paradox that the most enduring of the legendary stars of Hollywood's golden era should be one who in many ways bucked the trend. To begin with, there is the simple matter of his name. While the image makers at the big studios racked their brains to invent names that would reflect the screen personality of stars who had been cursed from birth with others that were dull, unpronounceable or simply not Anglo-Saxon enough for the American public, he kept his own, one that was unique for a film star of his day because of the combination of a Christian name with upper-class associates and a surname that sounded Dutch or German. A generation of boys in Britain and the United States-were registered-with-the invented names assigned to the leading actors their star-struck mothers adored- Wayne or Gary or Kirk-without ever being aware of stars' real names. Yet hardly any of the admirers of Humphrey Bogart saw fit to follow suit. 16. We learn from the passage that Humphrey Bogart's screen name was unusual in the great days of Hollywood because..... . .
A
Bogart sounds like a muslim name
B
it was his own name
C
it didn't appeal to American public
D
he'd always played gangster roles in his movies
Question 23 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
It is an interesting paradox that the most enduring of the legendary stars of Hollywood's golden era should be one who in many ways bucked the trend. To begin with, there is the simple matter of his name. While the image makers at the big studios racked their brains to invent names that would reflect the screen personality of stars who had been cursed from birth with others that were dull, unpronounceable or simply not Anglo-Saxon enough for the American public, he kept his own, one that was unique for a film star of his day because of the combination of a Christian name with upper-class associates and a surname that sounded Dutch or German. A generation of boys in Britain and the United States-were registered-with-the invented names assigned to the leading actors their star-struck mothers adored- Wayne or Gary or Kirk-without ever being aware of stars' real names. Yet hardly any of the admirers of Humphrey Bogart saw fit to follow suit. 17. We understand from the passage that considering his name, Humphrey Bogart..... .
A
could hardly continue his career
B
thought it was inappropriate to maintain his own name
C
wasn't able to reflect the power of his name
D
didn't go after the general tendency which most of the other stars followed
Question 24 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
It is an interesting paradox that the most enduring of the legendary stars of Hollywood's golden era should be one who in many ways bucked the trend. To begin with, there is the simple matter of his name. While the image makers at the big studios racked their brains to invent names that would reflect the screen personality of stars who had been cursed from birth with others that were dull, unpronounceable or simply not Anglo-Saxon enough for the American public, he kept his own, one that was unique for a film star of his day because of the combination of a Christian name with upper-class associates and a surname that sounded Dutch or German. A generation of boys in Britain and the United States-were registered-with-the invented names assigned to the leading actors their star-struck mothers adored- Wayne or Gary or Kirk-without ever being aware of stars' real names. Yet hardly any of the admirers of Humphrey Bogart saw fit to follow suit. 18. It's understood from the passage that..... .
A
the name Bogart is so interesting that it can keep people's interest in every country
B
stars in the USA except Humphrey Bogart were all born with names that didn't attract film fans.
C
the image makers of big studios were trying very hard to think of suitable names for stars
D
Christian names take off much better than the others in any foreign film industry
Question 25 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Most great singing stars have established themselves long before they get to 35, but that is how old Madge Sharp is now, and this is her first record, it will not be her last. ''I've always wanted to be a blues singer, '' she says. ''I used to listen to singers like Mahalia Jackson and Ella Fitzgerald and others on record, but my parents would never let me go £to a concert. And they never allowed me to sing with a band. The only singing I did for a years was in our church choir. Of course I wish I had started in the profession earlier, but I've got something now which a lot of younger singers haven't got-experience and maturity.'' ''And it's this experience and maturity in her voice which adds a distinct originality to all the tracks on this collection.All the songs may be old, but her versions of classics like ''Ife'' and ''Georgia'' make them sound as if they were written yesterday. 19. It is clearly stated in the passage that Madge Sharp..... .
A
made her first record later in her life than most singers
B
wanted to wait till she was experienced before making a record
C
will no longer make an album
D
was never allowed to listen to the other singers except Mahalia Jackson
Question 26 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Most great singing stars have established themselves long before they get to 35, but that is how old Madge Sharp is now, and this is her first record, it will not be her last. ''I've always wanted to be a blues singer, '' she says. ''I used to listen to singers like Mahalia Jackson and Ella Fitzgerald and others on record, but my parents would never let me go £to a concert. And they never allowed me to sing with a band. The only singing I did for a years was in our church choir. Of course I wish I had started in the profession earlier, but I've got something now which a lot of younger singers haven't got-experience and maturity.'' ''And it's this experience and maturity in her voice which adds a distinct originality to all the tracks on this collection.All the songs may be old, but her versions of classics like ''Ife'' and ''Georgia'' make them sound as if they were written yesterday. 20. It is understood from the passage that Madge Sharp..... .
A
was always supported by her family to become a blues singer
B
started her singing career by imitating the singers like Ella Fitzgerald
C
cannot sing as original as the younger singers can
D
probably gained most of her experience by singing in a church choir for a long time
Question 27 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Most great singing stars have established themselves long before they get to 35, but that is how old Madge Sharp is now, and this is her first record, it will not be her last. ''I've always wanted to be a blues singer, '' she says. ''I used to listen to singers like Mahalia Jackson and Ella Fitzgerald and others on record, but my parents would never let me go £to a concert. And they never allowed me to sing with a band. The only singing I did for a years was in our church choir. Of course I wish I had started in the profession earlier, but I've got something now which a lot of younger singers haven't got-experience and maturity.'' ''And it's this experience and maturity in her voice which adds a distinct originality to all the tracks on this collection.All the songs may be old, but her versions of classics like ''Ife'' and ''Georgia'' make them sound as if they were written yesterday. 21. It can be concluded from the passage that..... . .
A
all the younger singers want to sing as Madge Sharp does
B
Madge Sharp's first record doesn't include even one new song
C
most of the great singing stars appreciated her way of singing
D
Madge Sharp never dreamed about being a singer when she was a child
Question 28 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
One afternoon last spring, eight women found themselves at a resort in Texas stretched out on the floor on mats, each with a series of acupuncture needles protruding from their bodies. The atmosphere was calming and happy as an acupuncturist quietly moved from woman to woman, twisting and turning the needles, recalls Heidi Schell, one of those women who were nearing the end of a week-long retreat, all working towards the same goal-to get pregnant, The journey that led Ms. Schell to the group acupuncture session will sound familiar to many women: she was among the 36\% of females in the United States who had been seeking medical assistance to have a baby. To do so, she was among the 1\% of women trying high-tech treatments-in her case, in vitro fertilization (IVF). But, at 40 years of age, her chances of conceiving via IVF were a decidedly slim 10\%. 22. As is mentioned in the passage, acupuncture..... .
A
has come out as a branch of medicine first in the United States
B
is a treatment process of at least one week
C
is regarded as an exhausting journey to cure most of the diseases by professional acupuncturists
D
is a curative aid received by some of the women in the USA to have a baby
Question 29 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
One afternoon last spring, eight women found themselves at a resort in Texas stretched out on the floor on mats, each with a series of acupuncture needles protruding from their bodies. The atmosphere was calming and happy as an acupuncturist quietly moved from woman to woman, twisting and turning the needles, recalls Heidi Schell, one of those women who were nearing the end of a week-long retreat, all working towards the same goal-to get pregnant, The journey that led Ms. Schell to the group acupuncture session will sound familiar to many women: she was among the 36\% of females in the United States who had been seeking medical assistance to have a baby. To do so, she was among the 1\% of women trying high-tech treatments-in her case, in vitro fertilization (IVF). But, at 40 years of age, her chances of conceiving via IVF were a decidedly slim 10\%. 23. We understand from the passage that..... .
A
in the USA, 64% of females have the ability to get pregnant without having any treatment
B
Heidi Schell managed to get pregnant by means of the group acupuncture sessions she participated in
C
medical assistance could only be given to the women trying to get pregnant
D
acupuncture wasn't a popular method to have a baby among the women in the USA
Question 30 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
One afternoon last spring, eight women found themselves at a resort in Texas stretched out on the floor on mats, each with a series of acupuncture needles protruding from their bodies. The atmosphere was calming and happy as an acupuncturist quietly moved from woman to woman, twisting and turning the needles, recalls Heidi Schell, one of those women who were nearing the end of a week-long retreat, all working towards the same goal-to get pregnant, The journey that led Ms. Schell to the group acupuncture session will sound familiar to many women: she was among the 36\% of females in the United States who had been seeking medical assistance to have a baby. To do so, she was among the 1\% of women trying high-tech treatments-in her case, in vitro fertilization (IVF). But, at 40 years of age, her chances of conceiving via IVF were a decidedly slim 10\%. 24. It is implied in the passage that..... . .
A
the prospect of Heidi Schell's having a baby through IVF was almost impossible
B
most of the women who had been pursuing the ways to be able to get pregnant tried high-tech treatments
C
the majority of the women living in the USA needed a medical assistance to get pregnant
D
the atmosphere of all the acupuncture sessions in the USA is disturbing and raging
Question 31 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
The best performing oil investment comes from trees in Malaysia, not the deserts of Saudi Arabia, vegetable oils from palm trees are being used in products like Hellmann's mayonnaise and snickers chocolate bars.After petroleum prices doubled in the past three years and governments encouraged renewable fuels, the use of palm oil started to grow. Right now, it is the cheapest and most efficient of vegetable oils. Palm oil, however, is not without its detractors. The growing use of palm oil as fuel may threaten virgin rain forests in Southeast Asia and quicken deforestation, raising the likelihood of legal challenges from environmentalists, say some investors. The biggest challenge to palm oil is sustainability. In other words, biodiesel aims to be environmentally friendly. Nonetheless, this would not be the case if the feedstock were only grown at the expense of virgin rainforest.It is stated in the passage that vegetable oils from palm trees..... . .
A
are rarely produced in Southeast Asia
B
are used just for trucks and cars as fuel
C
don't perform well when compared with other alternative vegetable oils used at present
D
are currently being utilized in marketing articles of some famous companies
Question 32 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
The best performing oil investment comes from trees in Malaysia, not the deserts of Saudi Arabia, vegetable oils from palm trees are being used in products like Hellmann's mayonnaise and snickers chocolate bars.After petroleum prices doubled in the past three years and governments encouraged renewable fuels, the use of palm oil started to grow. Right now, it is the cheapest and most efficient of vegetable oils. Palm oil, however, is not without its detractors. The growing use of palm oil as fuel may threaten virgin rain forests in Southeast Asia and quicken deforestation, raising the likelihood of legal challenges from environmentalists, say some investors. The biggest challenge to palm oil is sustainability. In other words, biodiesel aims to be environmentally friendly. Nonetheless, this would not be the case if the feedstock were only grown at the expense of virgin rainforest. 2. As it is emphasized in the passage. Why the use of palm oil is increasing the reason is that..... . .
A
its price lowered sharply in the past three years
B
other vegetable oils quicken deforestation
C
it is the most economical, efficacious and sustainable one of all the vegetable oils
D
the best performing oil comes from Malaysia
Question 33 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
The best performing oil investment comes from trees in Malaysia, not the deserts of Saudi Arabia, vegetable oils from palm trees are being used in products like Hellmann's mayonnaise and snickers chocolate bars.After petroleum prices doubled in the past three years and governments encouraged renewable fuels, the use of palm oil started to grow. Right now, it is the cheapest and most efficient of vegetable oils. Palm oil, however, is not without its detractors. The growing use of palm oil as fuel may threaten virgin rain forests in Southeast Asia and quicken deforestation, raising the likelihood of legal challenges from environmentalists, say some investors. The biggest challenge to palm oil is sustainability. In other words, biodiesel aims to be environmentally friendly. Nonetheless, this would not be the case if the feedstock were only grown at the expense of virgin rainforest. 3. One may infer from the passage that..... .
A
Saudi Arabia surpasses Malaysia in producing efficient palm oil
B
no matter how much palm oil seems to be ecofriendly, it may be a strong cause of the end of virgin rain forests
C
biodiesel is a term much more different from palm oil
D
governments and inverstors have ignored the legal challenges of some environmentalists
Question 34 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
One of the world's best-known waterfalls is Niagara Falls, on the border between Canada and the United States. Tourism was practically invented there. But the astonishing thing about Niagara's fame is how overrated it is. Niagara is no where near the biggest, waterfall in the world. Nor is it even the longest waterfall in the United States. What is it that makes a waterfall the best? It isn't height. There are many immensely long a waterfalls, some cascading thousands of feet such as Strupenfossen in Norway or Mutarazi Falls in Zimbabwe. Of course, when people go to see a waterfall they expect to see a serious amount of water. And Niagara's one claim to fame is that it is the biggest waterfall in North America in terms of volume 4. According to the passage, what makes Niagara the biggest waterfall in North America is that..... . .
A
it is the most attractive of all the waterfalls
B
it is the longest waterfall in the region
C
tourism reflects it as the greatest waterfall
D
it has much more capacity of water than any other fall in North America
Question 35 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
One of the world's best-known waterfalls is Niagara Falls, on the border between Canada and the United States. Tourism was practically invented there. But the astonishing thing about Niagara's fame is how overrated it is. Niagara is no where near the biggest, waterfall in the world. Nor is it even the longest waterfall in the United States. What is it that makes a waterfall the best? It isn't height. There are many immensely long a waterfalls, some cascading thousands of feet such as Strupenfossen in Norway or Mutarazi Falls in Zimbabwe. Of course, when people go to see a waterfall they expect to see a serious amount of water. And Niagara's one claim to fame is that it is the biggest waterfall in North America in terms of volume 5. As Is mentioned in the passage, ..... .
A
Niagara's size is somehow overestimated
B
tourists appreciate Niagara because the landscape is excellent
C
Niagara Falls is the most spectacular waterfall for most of the people
D
Niagara adds much to the preservation of wild life
Question 36 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
One of the world's best-known waterfalls is Niagara Falls, on the border between Canada and the United States. Tourism was practically invented there. But the astonishing thing about Niagara's fame is how overrated it is. Niagara is no where near the biggest, waterfall in the world. Nor is it even the longest waterfall in the United States. What is it that makes a waterfall the best? It isn't height. There are many immensely long a waterfalls, some cascading thousands of feet such as Strupenfossen in Norway or Mutarazi Falls in Zimbabwe. Of course, when people go to see a waterfall they expect to see a serious amount of water. And Niagara's one claim to fame is that it is the biggest waterfall in North America in terms of volume 6. As concluded in the passage..... . .
A
tourism was invented in Northern America
B
it's difficult to find any longer waterfalls than Niagara in the world
C
Mutarazi Falls is thought to be the biggest waterfall in terms of volume
D
people hope to see a great quantity of water when they go to a waterfall
There are 36 questions to complete.

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