Reading comprehension test 169

DOWNLOAD FREE PDF <<CLICK HERE>>

Reading comprehension questions answers for competitive exam

Question 1 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Stress has become a scourge afflicting not only busy executives, but also teenagers. What makes it such a common conversation piece these days is the fact that it's not a proper disease but a silent debilitator that takes its toll on the body over years or decades. Chronic Stress, researchers have come to agree; can lead to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, impaired cognitive function and a weakened immune system. recent study by British researchers at University College London reported that elevated chronic stress levels at the workplace lead to an increased risk of obesity, insulin intolerance and high cholesterol. Other research has shown a correlation between chronic stress and asthma, allergies, even the time it takes for wounds to heal. 7. The passage is mainly concerned with..... .
A
how people can cope with the bad effects of stress on their bodies
B
the conflicts about chronic stress among the researchers
C
the adverse impacts of the chronic stress on human health
D
why people are under the risk of feeling stress in their workplaces
Question 2 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Stress has become a scourge afflicting not only busy executives, but also teenagers. What makes it such a common conversation piece these days is the fact that it's not a proper disease but a silent debilitator that takes its toll on the body over years or decades. Chronic Stress, researchers have come to agree; can lead to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, impaired cognitive function and a weakened immune system. recent study by British researchers at University College London reported that elevated chronic stress levels at the workplace lead to an increased risk of obesity, insulin intolerance and high cholesterol. Other research has shown a correlation between chronic stress and asthma, allergies, even the time it takes for wounds to heal. 8. It is asserted in the passage that what makes stress a common issue being talked about these days..... . .
A
is that it is a hidden enemy that makes the body worn out without a proper disease
B
is because it has evolved over the millennia as the body's physical and emotional response accelerated
C
is a question that the researchers have been trying to answer for decades
D
is a popular matter of discussion among the experts
Question 3 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Stress has become a scourge afflicting not only busy executives, but also teenagers. What makes it such a common conversation piece these days is the fact that it's not a proper disease but a silent debilitator that takes its toll on the body over years or decades. Chronic Stress, researchers have come to agree; can lead to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, impaired cognitive function and a weakened immune system. recent study by British researchers at University College London reported that elevated chronic stress levels at the workplace lead to an increased risk of obesity, insulin intolerance and high cholesterol. Other research has shown a correlation between chronic stress and asthma, allergies, even the time it takes for wounds to heal. 9. It can be inferred from the passage that according to one of the researches, ..... . .
A
not all kinds of stress are bad
B
the more stressful you are the quicker you think
C
the duration of the recuperation of an injury may change according to the levels of chronic stress
D
the main reason of obesity may be the chronic stress levels in the workplaces
Question 4 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Charles Dickens was born on the South coast of England, near Portsmouth, in 1812. He began writing in his early twenties and wrote his first novel, The Pickwick Papers, in 1836. He always saw himself as a crusading novelist. He had great sympathy for the poor and downtrodden and many of his books highlight the injustices to be found in the society of the time. Charles Dickens was perhaps the greatest novelist of the nineteenth century. All his novels are still in print and they present a rich canvas of life and behaviour at all levels of contemporary society, many of his works, such as Oliver Twist, Great Expectations, David Copperfield, A Tale of Two Cities and A Christmas Carol, have been filmed, televised and presented as both straigh t plays '' and musicals, revealing the power and timelessness of his writing. 10. As mentioned in the passage, Charles Dickens..... . .
A
emphasized the societal unfairness of the era in most of his books
B
was the only child of a poor family living in Portsmouth
C
was regarded as a crusading writer by his readers
D
had a little interest in the people leading miserable lives in the society of his time
Question 5 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Charles Dickens was born on the South coast of England, near Portsmouth, in 1812. He began writing in his early twenties and wrote his first novel, The Pickwick Papers, in 1836. He always saw himself as a crusading novelist. He had great sympathy for the poor and downtrodden and many of his books highlight the injustices to be found in the society of the time. Charles Dickens was perhaps the greatest novelist of the nineteenth century. All his novels are still in print and they present a rich canvas of life and behaviour at all levels of contemporary society, many of his works, such as Oliver Twist, Great Expectations, David Copperfield, A Tale of Two Cities and A Christmas Carol, have been filmed, televised and presented as both straigh t plays '' and musicals, revealing the power and timelessness of his writing. 11. One may conclude from the passage that..... . .
A
Dickens' first novel, The Pickwick Papers, didn't have impact on the literature world as much as Oliver Twist did
B
the fact that most of Dickens' novels have been applied for the screen displays the strength and immortality of his literary works
C
some of Dickens'novels aren't present on the shelves of the bookstores today
D
Great Expectations is the best novel of Charles Dickens
Question 6 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Charles Dickens was born on the South coast of England, near Portsmouth, in 1812. He began writing in his early twenties and wrote his first novel, The Pickwick Papers, in 1836. He always saw himself as a crusading novelist. He had great sympathy for the poor and downtrodden and many of his books highlight the injustices to be found in the society of the time. Charles Dickens was perhaps the greatest novelist of the nineteenth century. All his novels are still in print and they present a rich canvas of life and behaviour at all levels of contemporary society, many of his works, such as Oliver Twist, Great Expectations, David Copperfield, A Tale of Two Cities and A Christmas Carol, have been filmed, televised and presented as both straigh t plays '' and musicals, revealing the power and timelessness of his writing. 12. It is stated in the passage that Charles Dickens' novels..... . .
A
didn't help him prevent from being forgotten
B
were too complex and long to be filmed, televised or presented as plays and musicals
C
are still in print but not easy to buy because of their high prices
D
exemplify a lot of scenes from the society that can be observed in the people's lifestyles and behaviours in the real life
Question 7 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
A long line of people waiting for the check-in;tired, and anxious, and not a few of them close to tears. Children separated from their parents. Armed and uniformed guards who make arbitrary-seeming selections. Intrusive body searches. Personal belongings turned, . carelessly out of bags. A dreary atmosphere of threat and intimidation. An African state close to collapse? Not at all. This is a scene repeated in a hundred first-world cities every hour-and an experience that is guaranteed to anyone who happens to have an airline ticket and who is determined to use it. Hard as it may be to believe, air travel was . an adventure and a luxury not that long ago. As for airports, they were mere like branch, line railway stations than today's industrial-sized holding and storing centres for human beings. And check-in? Check-in had still to be invented. 13. In the passage, the setting is..... .
A
a police station
B
a first world country
C
an African city
D
an airport
Question 8 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
A long line of people waiting for the check-in;tired, and anxious, and not a few of them close to tears. Children separated from their parents. Armed and uniformed guards who make arbitrary-seeming selections. Intrusive body searches. Personal belongings turned, . carelessly out of bags. A dreary atmosphere of threat and intimidation. An African state close to collapse? Not at all. This is a scene repeated in a hundred first-world cities every hour-and an experience that is guaranteed to anyone who happens to have an airline ticket and who is determined to use it. Hard as it may be to believe, air travel was . an adventure and a luxury not that long ago. As for airports, they were mere like branch, line railway stations than today's industrial-sized holding and storing centres for human beings. And check-in? Check-in had still to be invented. 14. As is stated in the passage, check-in procedures of the airports..... . .
A
may be exhausting for the passangers
B
are more common in underdeveloped countries
C
are only for the people who have been suspected
D
are the most entertaining parts of travelling
Question 9 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
A long line of people waiting for the check-in;tired, and anxious, and not a few of them close to tears. Children separated from their parents. Armed and uniformed guards who make arbitrary-seeming selections. Intrusive body searches. Personal belongings turned, . carelessly out of bags. A dreary atmosphere of threat and intimidation. An African state close to collapse? Not at all. This is a scene repeated in a hundred first-world cities every hour-and an experience that is guaranteed to anyone who happens to have an airline ticket and who is determined to use it. Hard as it may be to believe, air travel was . an adventure and a luxury not that long ago. As for airports, they were mere like branch, line railway stations than today's industrial-sized holding and storing centres for human beings. And check-in? Check-in had still to be invented. 15. It may be understood from the passage that..... . .
A
planes are now much more comfortable than any other means of transportation
B
there was no such thing as check-in at the airports not that long ago
C
air travel is the most adventurous and luxurious experience of all
D
people never wait in a queue during the check-in process at the airports of first world cities
Question 10 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
In Kashmir, it has been one and half a year since the world turned upside down. Buildings crumbled, villages slipped off mountainsides, and lakes formed where rivers once flowed. The 7, 6 magnitude earthquake that hammered northern Pakistan and India on, Oct. 8/2005 took some 75, 000 lives, injured 130, 000 and left nearly 3.5 million people without food, jobs or homes-refugees in their own land. Almost overnight, scores of tent villages bloomed across the region, tended by international aid organizations, military personnal and jihadi groups working furiously to shelter the survivors before the onslaught of winter, mercifully, the season was mild. Fears of a second wave of death and suffering due to the cold proved unfounded. However, in many villages, electrical lines have not been repaired, neither have roads. Aid workers estimate that it will take years to rebuild what the earthquake took away. And for the thousands of survivors-many of their children, left maimed and bereft by the destruction-the recovery will never be complete. 16. One may Infer from the passage that the 7, 6 magnitude earthquake in Kashmir..... . .
A
left exactly 3, 5 million people without home
B
killed strictly 75.000 people
C
didn't cause as much damage to the northern Pakistan and India as it was exaggerated
D
has changed the geographical and geogical features of the region
Question 11 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
In Kashmir, it has been one and half a year since the world turned upside down. Buildings crumbled, villages slipped off mountainsides, and lakes formed where rivers once flowed. The 7, 6 magnitude earthquake that hammered northern Pakistan and India on, Oct. 8/2005 took some 75, 000 lives, injured 130, 000 and left nearly 3.5 million people without food, jobs or homes-refugees in their own land. Almost overnight, scores of tent villages bloomed across the region, tended by international aid organizations, military personnal and jihadi groups working furiously to shelter the survivors before the onslaught of winter, mercifully, the season was mild. Fears of a second wave of death and suffering due to the cold proved unfounded. However, in many villages, electrical lines have not been repaired, neither have roads. Aid workers estimate that it will take years to rebuild what the earthquake took away. And for the thousands of survivors-many of their children, left maimed and bereft by the destruction-the recovery will never be complete. 17. It Is stated in the passage that the weather conditions during the winter in Kashmir..... .
A
were a way merciful but cold took a lot of lives.
B
caused a second way of death and suffering after the destructive earthquake
C
showed that aid organizators were right to fear about
D
weren't harsh enough to kill the survivors of the earthquake as worried about
Question 12 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
In Kashmir, it has been one and half a year since the world turned upside down. Buildings crumbled, villages slipped off mountainsides, and lakes formed where rivers once flowed. The 7, 6 magnitude earthquake that hammered northern Pakistan and India on, Oct. 8/2005 took some 75, 000 lives, injured 130, 000 and left nearly 3.5 million people without food, jobs or homes-refugees in their own land. Almost overnight, scores of tent villages bloomed across the region, tended by international aid organizations, military personnal and jihadi groups working furiously to shelter the survivors before the onslaught of winter, mercifully, the season was mild. Fears of a second wave of death and suffering due to the cold proved unfounded. However, in many villages, electrical lines have not been repaired, neither have roads. Aid workers estimate that it will take years to rebuild what the earthquake took away. And for the thousands of survivors-many of their children, left maimed and bereft by the destruction-the recovery will never be complete. 18. According to the passage, for aid workers, reconstruction of what the earthquake knocked down will last for years but..... . .
A
the government. can't afford recreating a region
B
the whole recuperation will never be possible because of the physical and psychological damages of the destructive earthquake on people, especially children
C
electrical wires haven't been repaired yet
D
survivors from the earthquake have already started to obtain what they had lost again
Question 13 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Modern Formula One is a multibillion dolar sport that couldn't function without skilled teamwork and the latest technology. This season, the Orange Arrows team is strengthening its arsenal of technology sQlutions to streamline collaboration between team members and boost its racing competitiveness. Along with the usual wrenches and screwdrivers, Orange Arrow engineers now utilize handheld wirefree terminals that collect, synchronize and distribute all information relating to any of the thousands of possible vehicle settings. Car and race data are downloaded from the track to Orange Arrows headquarters where they are referenced to performance databases and computer models. This allows design teams to predict what effect a modification might have and to remotely offer advice on how to finetune the live vehicle configurations, and thus improve the chances of victory. 19. As mentioned in the passage, Formula One today is a kind of sport..... .
A
including approximate configurations and utilization of public statistics
B
which requires proficient and cooperative squad provided with the current equipment including hightech
C
of which a lot of companies just don't realize the fact that the latest technology and skilled teamwork are the basic components
D
that gives great pleasure to both the audience and the racers
Question 14 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Modern Formula One is a multibillion dolar sport that couldn't function without skilled teamwork and the latest technology. This season, the Orange Arrows team is strengthening its arsenal of technology sQlutions to streamline collaboration between team members and boost its racing competitiveness. Along with the usual wrenches and screwdrivers, Orange Arrow engineers now utilize handheld wirefree terminals that collect, synchronize and distribute all information relating to any of the thousands of possible vehicle settings. Car and race data are downloaded from the track to Orange Arrows headquarters where they are referenced to performance databases and computer models. This allows design teams to predict what effect a modification might have and to remotely offer advice on how to finetune the live vehicle configurations, and thus improve the chances of victory. 20. It is stated in the passage that hand held wirefree terminals..... . .
A
cost a great deal of money to construct
B
are the only technological buildings required by the design teams to strengthen racing competitiveness
C
have already become outdated
D
are used by the engineers in Orange Arrow to gather, organize and deliver all the data about each of the thousand possible craft settings
Question 15 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Modern Formula One is a multibillion dolar sport that couldn't function without skilled teamwork and the latest technology. This season, the Orange Arrows team is strengthening its arsenal of technology sQlutions to streamline collaboration between team members and boost its racing competitiveness. Along with the usual wrenches and screwdrivers, Orange Arrow engineers now utilize handheld wirefree terminals that collect, synchronize and distribute all information relating to any of the thousands of possible vehicle settings. Car and race data are downloaded from the track to Orange Arrows headquarters where they are referenced to performance databases and computer models. This allows design teams to predict what effect a modification might have and to remotely offer advice on how to finetune the live vehicle configurations, and thus improve the chances of victory. 21. As it is mentioned in the passage, Orange Arrow headquarters..... . .
A
are the technological craft in which car and race data downloaded from the track are linked to performance database and computer models
B
was intended by an intelligent entrepreneur to profit from the races.
C
offers solutions on how to deal with the configuration panels
D
have actually no use in the racing industry.
Question 16 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Normally the streets of Oaxaca, a .city of some 250, 000 people in the southern Mexico, are full of tourists. They come to enjoy the nearby Zapotec ruins of Monte Alban and the city's colonial churches, Indian markets and art galleries. But Oaxaca, designated a world heritage site by the United Nations, is today a much sorrier sight, For the past four months, it has been in the grip of a bitter political conflict that one local politician calls ''a low-intensity urban war. The Zocalo, the main square, is permanently occupied by several thousand protestors; more are camped out around the city. They have seized several radio stations and public offices. Many streets are blocked by barricades of parked buses or corrugated iron. Angry graffiti, in red and black-spray paint, disfigure many historical buildings. Not only has this conflict driven of the tourists; it also threatens peaceful nature of the citizens in the country. 22. It is understood from the passage that Oaxaca..... .
A
has been occupied by the enemies permanently
B
attracts a lot of tourists with its historical and social aspects
C
is a city in southern Mexico which is visited mostly by Mexican tourists
D
is one of the poorest but most democratic city in Mexico
Question 17 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Normally the streets of Oaxaca, a .city of some 250, 000 people in the southern Mexico, are full of tourists. They come to enjoy the nearby Zapotec ruins of Monte Alban and the city's colonial churches, Indian markets and art galleries. But Oaxaca, designated a world heritage site by the United Nations, is today a much sorrier sight, For the past four months, it has been in the grip of a bitter political conflict that one local politician calls ''a low-intensity urban war. The Zocalo, the main square, is permanently occupied by several thousand protestors; more are camped out around the city. They have seized several radio stations and public offices. Many streets are blocked by barricades of parked buses or corrugated iron. Angry graffiti, in red and black-spray paint, disfigure many historical buildings. Not only has this conflict driven of the tourists; it also threatens peaceful nature of the citizens in the country. 23. One may infer from the passage that Oaxaca..... . .
A
has a permanent traffic jam in its streets to be solved
B
is under the protection of the United Nations because of its importance in history
C
presents only historical tastes for the tourists
D
is a place where people often fall into political conflict
Question 18 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Normally the streets of Oaxaca, a .city of some 250, 000 people in the southern Mexico, are full of tourists. They come to enjoy the nearby Zapotec ruins of Monte Alban and the city's colonial churches, Indian markets and art galleries. But Oaxaca, designated a world heritage site by the United Nations, is today a much sorrier sight, For the past four months, it has been in the grip of a bitter political conflict that one local politician calls ''a low-intensity urban war. The Zocalo, the main square, is permanently occupied by several thousand protestors; more are camped out around the city. They have seized several radio stations and public offices. Many streets are blocked by barricades of parked buses or corrugated iron. Angry graffiti, in red and black-spray paint, disfigure many historical buildings. Not only has this conflict driven of the tourists; it also threatens peaceful nature of the citizens in the country. 24. It is stated in the passage the bitter political conflict in the city..... . .
A
may lead many protestors to be arrested
B
discourages the tourists to stay in the city and spoils the peace of the people living in Mexico
C
can cause the city to be dismissed from the list of world heritage site by the United Nations
D
weakens the political power of the government
Question 19 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
He may not inherit everything from his father. But King George Tupou V, Tonga's new monarch, who has been sworn in, but not formally crowned, following the death of the battleship-sized King Taufa'ahau Tupou IV on September 10th, already has a picturesque palace, the royal title and a good deal of respect from his 110.000 subjects in Tonga. The big question is whether he will bow to the pleas of the country's growing prodemocracy movement, and limit his throne's huge powersIt is understood from the passage that King George Tupou V ..... . .
A
owes his father everything
B
hasn't been declared as the new King of Tonga legally yet
C
has no respect towards King Taufa'ahau Tupou IV
D
learned all he knows about the royalty from his father
Question 20 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
He may not inherit everything from his father. But King George Tupou V, Tonga's new monarch, who has been sworn in, but not formally crowned, following the death of the battleship-sized King Taufa'ahau Tupou IV on September 10th, already has a picturesque palace, the royal title and a good deal of respect from his 110.000 subjects in Tonga. The big question is whether he will bow to the pleas of the country's growing prodemocracy movement, and limit his throne's huge powers 2. One may infer from the passage that in Tonga ..... .
A
most of people reject accepting his authority
B
there is spreading demand for regime change
C
King George Tupou V inherited a huge amount of money from Tupou V's father
D
Tupou V will not accept being the new king
Question 21 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
He may not inherit everything from his father. But King George Tupou V, Tonga's new monarch, who has been sworn in, but not formally crowned, following the death of the battleship-sized King Taufa'ahau Tupou IV on September 10th, already has a picturesque palace, the royal title and a good deal of respect from his 110.000 subjects in Tonga. The big question is whether he will bow to the pleas of the country's growing prodemocracy movement, and limit his throne's huge powers 3. As concluded in the passage that the monarch in Tonga ..... . .
A
has played a modernising role in governing the country in recent years
B
isn't a matter of the royal family
C
has enormous authorization in ruling the country
D
has been supporting the leading figures of the country's growing prodemocracy movement for a long time
Question 22 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Peter Yellowless, a professor of psychiatry at the University of California, Davis, has been teaching about schizophrenia for 20 years, but says that he was never really able to explain to his students just how their patients suffer. So he went online, downloaded some free software and entered Second Life. This is a ''meta-verse'' (i.e., metaphysical universe), a three-dimensional world whose users, or ''residents'', can create and be anything they want. Mr Yellowless created hallucinations. A resident might walk through a virtual hospital word, and a picture on the wall would suddenly flash the word ''shit face''. The floor might fall away, leaving the person to walk on stepping stones above the clouds. An in-world television set would change from showing an actual speech by Bob Hawke, Australia's former prime minister, into Mr Hawke shouting, ''Go and kill yourself, you wretch!'' A reflection in a mirror might have bleeding eyes and die. When Mr Yellowless invited, as part of a trial, Second Life's public into the ward, and 73\% of the visitors said afterwards that it ''improved (their) understanding of schizophrenia.'' 4. According to the passage, Second Life..... . .
A
is a software enabling its users to create a 3-dimensional world in which they can be and do anything they wish
B
is a computer programme created just for fun and leisure
C
is a built virtual online world whose population and economy are growing gradually
D
is a metaphysical online world in which its users are passive and can give no reactions
Question 23 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Peter Yellowless, a professor of psychiatry at the University of California, Davis, has been teaching about schizophrenia for 20 years, but says that he was never really able to explain to his students just how their patients suffer. So he went online, downloaded some free software and entered Second Life. This is a ''meta-verse'' (i.e., metaphysical universe), a three-dimensional world whose users, or ''residents'', can create and be anything they want. Mr Yellowless created hallucinations. A resident might walk through a virtual hospital word, and a picture on the wall would suddenly flash the word ''shit face''. The floor might fall away, leaving the person to walk on stepping stones above the clouds. An in-world television set would change from showing an actual speech by Bob Hawke, Australia's former prime minister, into Mr Hawke shouting, ''Go and kill yourself, you wretch!'' A reflection in a mirror might have bleeding eyes and die. When Mr Yellowless invited, as part of a trial, Second Life's public into the ward, and 73\% of the visitors said afterwards that it ''improved (their) understanding of schizophrenia.'' 5. It is stated in the passage that by means of Second Life, Peter Yellowless..... . .
A
could download free software easier than before
B
experienced a failure in his attempts to make his students comprehend schizophrenia better
C
produced sample hallucinations and tried to explain to his students how the schizophrenics suffer
D
gained great fame as a psychiatrist throughout the world
Question 24 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Peter Yellowless, a professor of psychiatry at the University of California, Davis, has been teaching about schizophrenia for 20 years, but says that he was never really able to explain to his students just how their patients suffer. So he went online, downloaded some free software and entered Second Life. This is a ''meta-verse'' (i.e., metaphysical universe), a three-dimensional world whose users, or ''residents'', can create and be anything they want. Mr Yellowless created hallucinations. A resident might walk through a virtual hospital word, and a picture on the wall would suddenly flash the word ''shit face''. The floor might fall away, leaving the person to walk on stepping stones above the clouds. An in-world television set would change from showing an actual speech by Bob Hawke, Australia's former prime minister, into Mr Hawke shouting, ''Go and kill yourself, you wretch!'' A reflection in a mirror might have bleeding eyes and die. When Mr Yellowless invited, as part of a trial, Second Life's public into the ward, and 73\% of the visitors said afterwards that it ''improved (their) understanding of schizophrenia.'' 6. One may infer from the passage that patients who suffer from schizophrenia..... . .
A
pretend to be normal while they are seeing hallucinations
B
can be cured through the hallucinations created in Second Life
C
are the participants of Peter Yellowless' trial of his online hallucinations
D
believe that they live in a metaphysical universe and they are wretch
Question 25 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Lame from birth, yet with a talent for landing on his feet, Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Perigord was for cartoonists a natural. As statesman and diplomat, he was at or never far from the centre of power through every upheaval that shook France and Europe between the fall of the Bastille and the collapse of the restored Bourbon monarchy in 1830. The ''price with six heads'', as one caricature nicely pictured him, was a bishop in the ''ancient regime, ''the revolutionist'' in 1789, diplomat for Napoleon, minister to Lous XVIII and lastly-by which time he was already in his late 70s ''an ambassador'' in London for Louis Philippe, the ''citizen king Such frequent shifts inevitably won him many enemies. But with each turn of the carousel former foes would become friends again. Talleyrand rose late, dressed slowly and played a lot of whist. He took a similar approach to politics, using time and delay to advantage. 7. One may infer from the passage that as a politician, Talleyrand..... . .
A
never forget his old partnerships throughout his career
B
always managed to be in a good, high and powerful position under any circumstances in France
C
could never be shrewd enough to manipulate the chaotic environment of his era
D
was a corrupt and immoral opportunist of exaggerated reputation interested mainly in his family name
Question 26 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Lame from birth, yet with a talent for landing on his feet, Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Perigord was for cartoonists a natural. As statesman and diplomat, he was at or never far from the centre of power through every upheaval that shook France and Europe between the fall of the Bastille and the collapse of the restored Bourbon monarchy in 1830. The ''price with six heads'', as one caricature nicely pictured him, was a bishop in the ''ancient regime, ''the revolutionist'' in 1789, diplomat for Napoleon, minister to Lous XVIII and lastly-by which time he was already in his late 70s ''an ambassador'' in London for Louis Philippe, the ''citizen king Such frequent shifts inevitably won him many enemies. But with each turn of the carousel former foes would become friends again. Talleyrand rose late, dressed slowly and played a lot of whist. He took a similar approach to politics, using time and delay to advantage. 8. It can be understood from the passage, Talleyrand..... . .
A
had a strict habit of getting up early
B
couldn't play whist well
C
was never at the centre of, power
D
served at least three rulers, having different political responsibilities
Question 27 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Lame from birth, yet with a talent for landing on his feet, Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Perigord was for cartoonists a natural. As statesman and diplomat, he was at or never far from the centre of power through every upheaval that shook France and Europe between the fall of the Bastille and the collapse of the restored Bourbon monarchy in 1830. The ''price with six heads'', as one caricature nicely pictured him, was a bishop in the ''ancient regime, ''the revolutionist'' in 1789, diplomat for Napoleon, minister to Lous XVIII and lastly-by which time he was already in his late 70s ''an ambassador'' in London for Louis Philippe, the ''citizen king Such frequent shifts inevitably won him many enemies. But with each turn of the carousel former foes would become friends again. Talleyrand rose late, dressed slowly and played a lot of whist. He took a similar approach to politics, using time and delay to advantage. 9. As is stated in the passage, Talleyrand..... . .
A
had a handicup in his feet
B
wasn't a successful statesman at all
C
worked as an minister in London for Napoleon
D
was believed to have six heads by people who never saw him
Question 28 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
The impact of the American periodical press also has been technological and social. The large, mass-circulation magazines have influenced the smaller magazines, which in many instances seek to imitate their appearance and to emulate the high quality of their printing, layout, and make-up. They also have influenced magazines around the world. Europe, for example, is given to publishing magazines resembling ''Life'' and ''Look'', and almost no heavily industrialized country is without its imitator of ''Time''. An example to this is ''Der Spiegel'' in Germany, The social effect has to do with the discharge or failure to discharge its social responsibilities. These include the obligation to provide the people with a fair presentation offacts, with honestly held opinions, and with truthful advertising. 10. It's understood from the passage that news magazines like ''Life, Look, and Time''..... .
A
do not discharge social responsibilities at all
B
sell very well throughout the worid
C
are sold extremely expensively on the market
D
are respected as models for foreign magazines
Question 29 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
The impact of the American periodical press also has been technological and social. The large, mass-circulation magazines have influenced the smaller magazines, which in many instances seek to imitate their appearance and to emulate the high quality of their printing, layout, and make-up. They also have influenced magazines around the world. Europe, for example, is given to publishing magazines resembling ''Life'' and ''Look'', and almost no heavily industrialized country is without its imitator of ''Time''. An example to this is ''Der Spiegel'' in Germany, The social effect has to do with the discharge or failure to discharge its social responsibilities. These include the obligation to provide the people with a fair presentation offacts, with honestly held opinions, and with truthful advertising. 11. According to the passage ..... .
A
American perodical press has no contribution to its European counterpart
B
smaller magazines have influenced the bigger ones throughout the history
C
nearly all the heavily industrialized countries have a magazine resembling to ''Time
D
der Spiegel is a magazine which originated in the USA.
Question 30 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
The impact of the American periodical press also has been technological and social. The large, mass-circulation magazines have influenced the smaller magazines, which in many instances seek to imitate their appearance and to emulate the high quality of their printing, layout, and make-up. They also have influenced magazines around the world. Europe, for example, is given to publishing magazines resembling ''Life'' and ''Look'', and almost no heavily industrialized country is without its imitator of ''Time''. An example to this is ''Der Spiegel'' in Germany, The social effect has to do with the discharge or failure to discharge its social responsibilities. These include the obligation to provide the people with a fair presentation offacts, with honestly held opinions, and with truthful advertising. 12. As concluded in the passage, magazines..... .
A
must imitate European models
B
shouldn't accept untruthful advertising
C
ought to be subsidized
D
shouldn't compete with television for advertising
There are 30 questions to complete.

DOWNLOAD FREE PDF <<CLICK HERE>>