Reading comprehension test 170

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Reading comprehension questions answers for competitive exam

Question 1 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
A team of astronomers from the Institute of Technology, led by Djorgovski, may have glimpsed the dawn of our universe. In 2001, this team reported that it had spotted the ''cosmic renaissance, '' the era when the first starlight shone through the cosmos. Just days earlier, a team from the Sloan Sky Survey had announced finding evidence of the cosmic ''dark ages''-the period of about half a billion years after the Big Bang when dark fog filled the newly created space of our universe. The cosmic renaissance brought an end to the dark ages, as the first galaxies and quasars burned through the murky cosmos, making it transparent. The teams used data collected with powerful telescopes to observe the light emissions of quasars, the most distant known objects in the universe. Quasars, which are amazingly bright, can essentially offer snapshots of the universe from hundreds of millions of years ago. 13. The latter team aforementioned has declared that..... .
A
dark ages were brought an end with the cosmic renaissance
B
the rise of the cosmos was believed to start with the first light of the sun
C
cosmic renaissance happened after one of the stars shone
D
they found out the proof of the dark age of the universe
Question 2 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
A team of astronomers from the Institute of Technology, led by Djorgovski, may have glimpsed the dawn of our universe. In 2001, this team reported that it had spotted the ''cosmic renaissance, '' the era when the first starlight shone through the cosmos. Just days earlier, a team from the Sloan Sky Survey had announced finding evidence of the cosmic ''dark ages''-the period of about half a billion years after the Big Bang when dark fog filled the newly created space of our universe. The cosmic renaissance brought an end to the dark ages, as the first galaxies and quasars burned through the murky cosmos, making it transparent. The teams used data collected with powerful telescopes to observe the light emissions of quasars, the most distant known objects in the universe. Quasars, which are amazingly bright, can essentially offer snapshots of the universe from hundreds of millions of years ago. 14. What do the two teams have in common? .
A
The devices used by the teams for gaining information on quasars were powerful telescopes
B
The main subject of the teams were about Big Bang
C
Both teams have mutual interests on how to scrutinize the history of the universe.
D
The teams worked on the same project in the twentieth century
Question 3 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
A team of astronomers from the Institute of Technology, led by Djorgovski, may have glimpsed the dawn of our universe. In 2001, this team reported that it had spotted the ''cosmic renaissance, '' the era when the first starlight shone through the cosmos. Just days earlier, a team from the Sloan Sky Survey had announced finding evidence of the cosmic ''dark ages''-the period of about half a billion years after the Big Bang when dark fog filled the newly created space of our universe. The cosmic renaissance brought an end to the dark ages, as the first galaxies and quasars burned through the murky cosmos, making it transparent. The teams used data collected with powerful telescopes to observe the light emissions of quasars, the most distant known objects in the universe. Quasars, which are amazingly bright, can essentially offer snapshots of the universe from hundreds of millions of years ago. 15. We can infer from the passage that quasars..... . .
A
have always been in flames since the beginning of the universe
B
the light of which reaching us basically comes from a very distant time
C
which are surprisingly bright stars can give us details about the history of the galaxies
D
whose photographs taken by a team of scientists inform the danger experienced during the history
Question 4 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
For those of us without a family crest and signet ring, there is a place a few inches above the finger where social standing can still be displayed-the wrist. With its ticking heartbeat, the mechanical wristwatch is alive and never felt better. And for most people, the very definition of a luxury watch is a a Rolex. It has a mystical aura of high fashion, high quality and high price. It's the most popular watch, with an estimated 750, 000 sold annually and even more changing hands each year in the second-hand market. The reason for Rolex's stunning success is the firm's genius at marketing to people who aspire to own and can afford to buy, the accoutrements of popular culture's nobility. The typical Rolex buyer is seeking to have something their neighbours and friends either have or wish they had. Rolex has struck a balance between making a product that is just expensive enough so not everyone will own one, but just affordable enough for it to be within the reach of many. 16. One point emphasized in the passage W is that..... . .
A
the wristwatch may be regarded as a symbol of social status and luxury by most of the people today
B
as it was in the old days, it is still indispensable to have a signet ring or a family crest for those who want to own the highest social rank
C
but for its prestige and price, Rolex defies its own image in the secondhand market
D
Rolex stands as the epitome of Swiss watchmaking excellence
Question 5 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
For those of us without a family crest and signet ring, there is a place a few inches above the finger where social standing can still be displayed-the wrist. With its ticking heartbeat, the mechanical wristwatch is alive and never felt better. And for most people, the very definition of a luxury watch is a a Rolex. It has a mystical aura of high fashion, high quality and high price. It's the most popular watch, with an estimated 750, 000 sold annually and even more changing hands each year in the second-hand market. The reason for Rolex's stunning success is the firm's genius at marketing to people who aspire to own and can afford to buy, the accoutrements of popular culture's nobility. The typical Rolex buyer is seeking to have something their neighbours and friends either have or wish they had. Rolex has struck a balance between making a product that is just expensive enough so not everyone will own one, but just affordable enough for it to be within the reach of many. 17. The author relates the success of Rolex..... . .
A
so clearly that even the rival firms must respect it
B
to its smart marketing system which determines and addresses to the target customer
C
to the people who work in its administration and marketing departments
D
in an exaggerated style
Question 6 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
For those of us without a family crest and signet ring, there is a place a few inches above the finger where social standing can still be displayed-the wrist. With its ticking heartbeat, the mechanical wristwatch is alive and never felt better. And for most people, the very definition of a luxury watch is a a Rolex. It has a mystical aura of high fashion, high quality and high price. It's the most popular watch, with an estimated 750, 000 sold annually and even more changing hands each year in the second-hand market. The reason for Rolex's stunning success is the firm's genius at marketing to people who aspire to own and can afford to buy, the accoutrements of popular culture's nobility. The typical Rolex buyer is seeking to have something their neighbours and friends either have or wish they had. Rolex has struck a balance between making a product that is just expensive enough so not everyone will own one, but just affordable enough for it to be within the reach of many. 18. One conclusion we can draw from the passage is that..... . .
A
Rolex has managed to make a product that is attainable for many despite its price
B
the standard Rolex buyer is always in the pursuit of possessing the items which their neighbours already have
C
Rolex holds the biggest share of the electrical appliance market in the world
D
Rolex can be defined as one of the most popular watches of all
Question 7 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Some modern anthropologists hold that biological evolution has shaped not only human morphology but also human behavior. The role those anthropologists ascribe to evolution is not of dictating the details of human behavior but one of imposing, constraints-ways of feeling, thinking, and acting that ''come naturally'' in archetypal situations in any culture. Our ''frailties'' emotions and motives such as rage, fear, greed, gluttony, joy, lust, love-may be a very mixed assortment quality: we are, as we say, ''in the grip'' of them. And thus they give us oursense of constraints. Unhappily, some of those frailties our need for ever-increasing security among them are presently maladaptive. Yet beneath the overlay of cultural detail, they, too, are said to be biological in direction, and therefore as natural to us as are our appendixes. We would need to comprehend throughly their adaptive origins in order to understand how badly they guide us now. And we might then begin to resist their pressure. 19. The author implies that control to any extent over the ''frailties'' that constrain our behavior is though to presuppose..... .
A
a thorough grasp of the principle that cultural detail in human behavior can differ arbitrarily from society to society
B
that there are cultures in which those frailties do not ''come naturally'' and from which such control can be learned
C
that there is little or no overlay of cultural detail that masks their true nature
D
a full understanding of why those frailties evolved and of how they function now
Question 8 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Some modern anthropologists hold that biological evolution has shaped not only human morphology but also human behavior. The role those anthropologists ascribe to evolution is not of dictating the details of human behavior but one of imposing, constraints-ways of feeling, thinking, and acting that ''come naturally'' in archetypal situations in any culture. Our ''frailties'' emotions and motives such as rage, fear, greed, gluttony, joy, lust, love-may be a very mixed assortment quality: we are, as we say, ''in the grip'' of them. And thus they give us oursense of constraints. Unhappily, some of those frailties our need for ever-increasing security among them are presently maladaptive. Yet beneath the overlay of cultural detail, they, too, are said to be biological in direction, and therefore as natural to us as are our appendixes. We would need to comprehend throughly their adaptive origins in order to understand how badly they guide us now. And we might then begin to resist their pressure. 20. It can be inferred that in his discussion of maladaptive frailties the author assumes that..... . .
A
maladaptive characteristics, once fixed, make the emergence of other maladaptive characteristics more likely
B
any structure or behavior not positively adaptive is regarded as transitory in evolutionary theory
C
evolution does not favor the emergence of adaptive characteristics over the emergence of maladaptive ones
D
changes in the total human environment can outpace evolutionary change
Question 9 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
Some modern anthropologists hold that biological evolution has shaped not only human morphology but also human behavior. The role those anthropologists ascribe to evolution is not of dictating the details of human behavior but one of imposing, constraints-ways of feeling, thinking, and acting that ''come naturally'' in archetypal situations in any culture. Our ''frailties'' emotions and motives such as rage, fear, greed, gluttony, joy, lust, love-may be a very mixed assortment quality: we are, as we say, ''in the grip'' of them. And thus they give us oursense of constraints. Unhappily, some of those frailties our need for ever-increasing security among them are presently maladaptive. Yet beneath the overlay of cultural detail, they, too, are said to be biological in direction, and therefore as natural to us as are our appendixes. We would need to comprehend throughly their adaptive origins in order to understand how badly they guide us now. And we might then begin to resist their pressure. 21. Which of the following most probably provides an appropriate analogy from human morphology for the ''details'' versus ''constraints'' distinction made in the passage in relation to human behaviour? .
A
The ability of some people to dive to great depths as against most people's inability to swim long distance
B
The psychological profile of those people who are able to delay gratification as against people's inability to control their lives completely
C
The greater lung capacity of mountain peoples that helps them live in oxygen-poor air as against people's inability to fly without special apparatus
D
The ability of most people to see all the colors of the visible spectrum as against most peoples inability to name any but the primary colors
Question 10 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
For most modern airports, the major design problem is scale-how to allow adequate space on the ground for maneuvering widebody jets while permitting convenient and rapid movement of passengers departing, arriving, or transferring from one flight to another. Most designs for airport terminals take one of three approaches. In the linear plan, the building may be straight or curved. The passengers' board aircraft parked next to the terminal. This plan works well for small airports that need to provide boarding areas for only a few aircraft at a time. In the satellite plan, passengers board aircraft from small terminals that are separated from the main terminals. Passengers reach the satellites by way of shuttle trains or underground passage ways that have shuttle trains or moving side walks. The transporter plan employs some system of transport to move passengers from the terminal building to the aircraft. If buses are used, the passengers must climb a flight of stairs to board the aircraft. If mobile lounges are used, they can link up directly with the aircraft and protect passengers from the weather. 22. We may infer from the passage that scale would not pose a major design problem at airports if..... . .
A
aircraft did not need so much space to maneuver on the ground
B
other forms of transportation were more efficient
C
there were no airplanes
D
airplanes could fly faster
Question 11 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
For most modern airports, the major design problem is scale-how to allow adequate space on the ground for maneuvering widebody jets while permitting convenient and rapid movement of passengers departing, arriving, or transferring from one flight to another. Most designs for airport terminals take one of three approaches. In the linear plan, the building may be straight or curved. The passengers' board aircraft parked next to the terminal. This plan works well for small airports that need to provide boarding areas for only a few aircraft at a time. In the satellite plan, passengers board aircraft from small terminals that are separated from the main terminals. Passengers reach the satellites by way of shuttle trains or underground passage ways that have shuttle trains or moving side walks. The transporter plan employs some system of transport to move passengers from the terminal building to the aircraft. If buses are used, the passengers must climb a flight of stairs to board the aircraft. If mobile lounges are used, they can link up directly with the aircraft and protect passengers from the weather. 23. According to the passage, the linear plan would probably be best at..... .
A
an airport with only a few arrivals or departures
B
only under good weather conditions
C
a busy airport
D
an airport used by many small aircraft
Question 12 [CLICK ON ANY CHOICE TO KNOW THE RIGHT ANSWER]
For most modern airports, the major design problem is scale-how to allow adequate space on the ground for maneuvering widebody jets while permitting convenient and rapid movement of passengers departing, arriving, or transferring from one flight to another. Most designs for airport terminals take one of three approaches. In the linear plan, the building may be straight or curved. The passengers' board aircraft parked next to the terminal. This plan works well for small airports that need to provide boarding areas for only a few aircraft at a time. In the satellite plan, passengers board aircraft from small terminals that are separated from the main terminals. Passengers reach the satellites by way of shuttle trains or underground passage ways that have shuttle trains or moving side walks. The transporter plan employs some system of transport to move passengers from the terminal building to the aircraft. If buses are used, the passengers must climb a flight of stairs to board the aircraft. If mobile lounges are used, they can link up directly with the aircraft and protect passengers from the weather. 24. It's implied in the passage that the term ''satellite plan'' is used because..... .
A
small terminals encircle the main terminal like satellites around a planet
B
it initiates the idea of space, travelling
C
the plan makes use of the most modem, high-technology equipment
D
airports that make use of this plan utilize data from weather satellites
There are 12 questions to complete.