The Victorian Novel

 

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The Victorian Novel

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Question 1
Dickens uses realism as a technique to support a larger theme that underlies his writing. He criticizes the institutionalized corruption that existed and attempts to engage the readers' emotions (frustration, anger or sadness) on behalf of the victims. Which of these passages best illustrates this technique?
A
"'I began to keep the little creatures, ' she said, 'with an object that the wards will readily comprehend. With the intention of restoring them to liberty. When my judgment should be given. Ye-es! They die in prison, though. Their lives, poor silly things, are so short in comparison with Chancery proceedings that, one by one, the whole collection has died over and over again. I doubt, do you know, whether one of these, though they are all young, will live to be free! Ve-ry mortifying, is it not?"'
B
"Bless you, sir, the way she tended them two children after the mother died was the talk of the yard! And it was a wonder to see her with him after he was took ill, it really was! 'Mrs. Blinder, ' he said to me the very last he spoke-he was lying there-'Mrs. Blinder, whatever my calling may have been, I see a angel sitting in this room last night along with my child, and I trust her to Our Father!"
C
"There was such a shock of apprehension in his face, and he knew Richard so perfectly, and I too had seen so much of his gradual decay, that what my dear girl had said to me in the fullness of her foreboding love sounded like a knell in my ears. 'In case you should be wanting Mr. C., sir, ' said Mr. Vholes, coming after us, 'you'll find him in court. I left him there resting himself a little. Good day, sir; good day, Miss Summerson.' As he gave me that slowly devouring look of his, while twisting up the strings of his bag before he hastened with it after Mr. Kenge, the benignant shadow of whose conversational presence he seemed afraid to leave, he gave one gasp as if he had swallowed the last morsel of his client, and his black buttoned-up unwholesome figure glided away to the low door at the end of the Hall."
D
All of these
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Question 2
Fiction and non-fiction frequently influence one another. This was particularly true in Victorian Britain. Which author was particularly influential to the writing of Darwin's The Origin of Species
A
Bram Stoker
B
Thomas Hardy
C
Wilkie Collins
D
Charles Dickens
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Question 3
Middle- and upper-class Victorian women faced complicated expectations regarding paid work. Why?
A
They could not work if they were pregnant or nursing small children.
B
Women of the middle and upper classes were supposed to marry and stay home as centers of the Victorian family-but many households could not be supported on a single income.
C
There were so many lower-class women in the workforce that there was no need for middle-class women to work.
D
Paid work was unnecessary because the salaries of men in the middle class were very high.
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Question 4
The "Condition-of-England" novel was often influenced by external factors. Which of the following non-fiction accounts might have influenced this genre?
A
Mayhew's London Labor and the London Poor
B
Darwin's The Origin of Species
C
Lombroso's work on criminals
D
Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre
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Question 5
In what ways is Journey to the Center of the Earth similar to the actual journey of the H.M.S. Beagle and Darwin?
A
Both are driven by a sense of mystery and a need for discovery-to answer questions and to find solutions.
B
Both demonstrate a fear of the unknown and are allegorical stories about doubt.
C
Neither reflects the narrative style of careful collection of data and description of places or objects.
D
Neither of the journeys make any real impact on the surrounding people, or the wider community of scientists.
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There are 5 questions to complete.

 

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