The Victorian Novel

The Victorian Novel

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Question 11 [CLICK ON ANY COICE TO KNOW RIGHT ANSWER]
The British Empire is often described as "ambivalent" in its expansion. Which of the following best explains this in terms of Victorian Imperialism?
A
The British were always interested in expanding their territories and had little to no concern for trade.
B
The British were committed to expanding the empire in every direction and actively sought to increase their land holdings.
C
The British were not always interested in the territories that they took over, but occasionally felt compelled to conquer one territory to protect another.
D
The British were at war with other countries and colonies on the grounds of religious persecution.
Question 12 [CLICK ON ANY COICE TO KNOW RIGHT ANSWER]
Which of the following passages most accurately depicts the sensation-fiction technique of using shock or highly charged emotions?
A
"When he had thoroughly recovered himself, and had joined me on the beach, his warm Southern nature broke through all artificial English restraints in a moment. He overwhelmed me with the wildest expressions of affection-exclaimed passionately, in his exaggerated Italian way, that he would hold his life henceforth at my disposal-and declared that he should never be happy again until he had found an opportunity of proving his gratitude by rendering me some service which I might remember, on my side, to the end of my days."
B
"We both bounced into the parlour in a highly abrupt and undignified manner. My mother sat by the open window laughing and fanning herself. Pesca was one of her especial favourites and his wildest eccentricities were always pardonable in her eyes."
C
I had mechanically turned in this latter direction, and was strolling along the lonely high-road-idly wondering, I remember, what the Cumberland young ladies would look like-when, in one moment, every drop of blood in my body was brought to a stop by the touch of a hand laid lightly and suddenly on my shoulder from behind me. I turned on the instant, with my fingers tightening round the handle of my stick. There, in the middle of the broad bright high-road-there, as if it had that moment sprung out of the earth or dropped from the heaven-stood the figure of a solitary Woman, dressed from head to foot in white.....
D
"The first touch of womanly tenderness that I had heard from her trembled in her voice as she said the words; but no tears glistened in those large, wistfully attentive eyes of hers, which were still fixed on me."
Question 13 [CLICK ON ANY COICE TO KNOW RIGHT ANSWER]
Select the option in which all three factors listed were pre-conditions of the Industrial Revolution in Britain.
A
Literacy, law, and military power
B
Widely available printed material, literacy, adequate transportation
C
Slave owners, slave labor, and the East India Trading Company
D
Adequate transportation, gothic novels, and the steam engine
Question 14 [CLICK ON ANY COICE TO KNOW RIGHT ANSWER]
Woodblock illustrations were important until the development of line illustrations and other methods. Three outstanding woodblook illustrators of the period before line-drawing include:
A
Napier, Hopkinson, and Cope.
B
Charles Dickens, William Thackery, and Lewis Carroll.
C
Douglas Jerrold, Lewis Carroll, and Charles Kingsley.
D
Gustav Dor'e, John Tenniel, and Linley Sambourne.
Question 15 [CLICK ON ANY COICE TO KNOW RIGHT ANSWER]
In many ways, Bleak House is a "Condition-of-England" novel. Which of the following passages best reflects the tenets of this genre?
A
"It is not a large world. Relatively even to this world of ours, which has its limits too (as your Highness shall find when you have made the tour of it and are come to the brink of the void beyond), it is a very little speck. There is much good in it; there are many good and true people in it; it has its appointed place."
B
"My Lady Dedlock has returned to her house in town for a few days previous to her departure for Paris, where her ladyship intends to stay some weeks, after which her movements are uncertain. The fashionable intelligence says so for the comfort of the Parisians, and it knows all fashionable things."
C
"This is the Court of Chancery, which has its decaying houses and its blighted lands in every shire, which has its worn-out lunatic in every madhouse and its dead in every churchyard, which has its ruined suitor with his slipshod heels and threadbare dress borrowing and begging through the round of every man's acquaintance, which gives to monied might the means abundantly of wearying out the right, which so exhausts finances, patience, courage, hope, so overthrows the brain and breaks the heart, that there is not an honourable man among its practitioners who would not give-who does not often give-the warning, 'Suffer any wrong that can be done you rather than come here!"'
D
"I have a great deal of difficulty in beginning to write my portion of these pages, for I know I am not clever. I always knew that. I can remember, when I was a very little girl indeed, I used to say to my doll when we were alone together, 'Now, Dolly, I am not clever, you know very well, and you must be patient with me, like a dear!' And so she used to sit propped up in a great arm-chair, with her beautiful complexion and rosy lips, staring at me-or not so much at me, I think, as at nothing-while I busily stitched away and told her every one of my secrets."
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